For those LVN's tha challenged the boards... - page 2

in CA, is the board really "strict" of ones bed side experience. i'm asking because i do not have maternity bed side experience (as a CNA). i'm just curious to see how "strict" they are. TIA for... Read More

  1. by   txspadequeenRN
    i was thinking the very same thing!!!

    Quote from tgb3rn
    omg, i can't believe this. i was an lpn for 3 years then graduated from excelsior as an rn. the only state i can never work in as an rn is cali but they let a cna challenge the lpn. what a load of 0@##^%%$*^(&^%!!!!:angryfire :trout:
    tom
  2. by   Multicollinearity
    California has always had some unusual procedures with professional licensing which allows a wide latitude for challenging board exams. For example, California is the last state to allow students from non-ABA accredited law schools to challenge and take the BAR exam. California also allows a two-year nurse practitioner program at a community college. Not that medicare will pay those non-MSN NPs.

    Remember a thread a while back about a woman who was able to get her RN license without graduating from a nursing program? It was because she had enough hours done in nursing school? Or something like that?
    Last edit by Multicollinearity on May 31, '07
  3. by   EricJRN
    Moved to the California Forum for more answers to the OP's questions.
  4. by   BonnieSc
    Quote from multicollinarity

    Remember a thread a while back about a woman who was able to get her RN license without graduating from a nursing program? It was because she had enough hours done in nursing school? Or something like that?
    You might mean me--I don't know if others have brought it up. I decided not to do it, but the situation in California is that a BSN student can sit for the NCLEX and become an RN before graduating, once s/he's taken the courses required for the state board. Basically, s/he finishes the amount of schooling that ADNs get, and becomes an RN while still finishing up the BSN classes. It's pretty common here.
  5. by   pagandeva2000
    I'm saying the same thing...CNA does not equal to LPN. Not insulting the wonderful CNAs out there, but it does not make sense because there are SO MANY things missing out of their education to make them a nurse. If this is what is going on, then, it makes me believe that California is putting a computerized NCLEX to the side just for them, and how fair is that??
  6. by   suzanne4
    Quote from Wendy79
    You might mean me--I don't know if others have brought it up. I decided not to do it, but the situation in California is that a BSN student can sit for the NCLEX and become an RN before graduating, once s/he's taken the courses required for the state board. Basically, s/he finishes the amount of schooling that ADNs get, and becomes an RN while still finishing up the BSN classes. It's pretty common here.

    It is actually not very common at all. Most do not get the majority of their nursing courses that are required until the end of their program. And another thing to think about: those in a two year program can usually write the NCLEX-PN exam after completing the first year, but for those in the four year program, they cannot do it until they have completed the three years first and only have the final year to complete.

    You see this more with the direct entry mSN programs that only offer the MSN and do not issue the BSN during the program.
    ------------------------
    Have yet to see one CNA get thru with challenging the PN Boards. Does not matter what their website states, the issue is that you do not see it getting done, only the corpsmen can and routinely have challenged the NCLEX-PN exam. And they functioned as practical nurses in the military, not as nursing assts. Nor have I ever seen one get hired that did not complete an approved curriculum.

    Just because something is posted, does not mean that it happens. Definitely not the case in this.
  7. by   BonnieSc
    As I mentioned in another topic, I think it's probably become less common than it was several years ago (based on what older nurses have told me; I don't know actual numbers). A couple of people in my BSN graduating class took the NCLEX before graduating. A faculty member told me that every semester there are quite a few people who say they're going to do it, and then change their minds, deciding that it's not a big deal to wait a few more months.
  8. by   pagandeva2000
    Again, I have to say that it isn't fair to the LPNs that have completed an entire course of study to have a CNA challenge the boards with just a few years of experience and a pharmacology course. There is too much missing, too many terms and situations not encountered to do this.
  9. by   jjjoy
    I'm in Cali and I've never heard of anyone getting their LVN license via challenging the board except for military medics. I'm not familiar with it and haven't checked on it as I've never heard of it happening.

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