CSUEB Fall 2012, can I also work?

  1. 0
    Hi,

    I was accepted into CSUEB's BSN program for this coming Fall 2012. I would like to know if anyone was able to work while in the program. If so, how many hours weekly? I am also trying to figure out how the classes and clinical rotations are scheduled on the Concord campus. I would like to find a job in the summer that I could keep throughout the program. I know a nursing students schedule is not set in stone and we must be flexible, but what were your schedules like? I really need to work. Thanks!

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  2. 10 Comments...

  3. 0
    Not speaking from experience as I've just been accepted myself, but I've seen a few people on threads saying they were able to work while in nursing school. Also, we started a Facebook page for the folks that will be at the Concord campus. You should join us. Just go to groups and search " CSUEB Nursing". Hope to see ya there.
  4. 0
    I graduated as a part of the first class at the Concord campus in 2008. People were able to work during the program, but full-time would probably not be possible nor would it be advisable. I worked one 8-hour shift a week after Level I when I was eligble to work as a CNA but I also had a newborn at home so that required a lot too. Some people worked 3 days a week. Most clinicals and classes are M-F during business hours but there are some clinicals and classes in the evening some quarters. When you select skills labs and clinical your priority changes every quarter to be fair. So depending on your priority you may or may not get a choice in your schedule. It also depends on other variables like how much you need to study because everyone is different. For some people nursing school is really really difficult and they need to work extra hard. Then some people made it look easy. Also keep in mind if you are going to get fininacial aid, most of the time you need to maintain 12 units a quarter so you may have to take extra "cushion" classes to meet that requirement which means busy work. Things may have changed since I have been there, but I hope this helps. Good Luck.
  5. 0
    Congrats on getting in!! I am applying there for FALL 13 what was your stats ? East bay is hard to get into great job!
  6. 0
    Im an '11 graduate. Working part time is doable if you have solid study habits, but make sure your work is flexible with scheduling because clinical rotations can be unpredictable--you sometimes don't know where you will end up until last minute. I'd say the hardest time to work would be the second year, because of the constant 5-week rotation changing. Driving to the facility the night before for patient assignments is very time consuming. Care planning is time consuming. I saved some coin and quit my job when the program started, because I didn't want my grades to suffer. The job market these days makes lower GPA grads work harder to land jobs. If there's any way you can avoid working, don't work. If you MUST work, work part time. I only know of maybe 3 or 4 people who help full time jobs throughout the program, all of their grades suffered as a result but all managed to make it to the finish line. Good luck.
  7. 0
    Hi Itsthegreeneyes,

    Thank you for your response, it was very helpful. I was thinking of CNA and then LVN work after I am licensed. I will graduate from the Los Medanos College LVN program this month. I worked part time last semester at a night job that wasn't flexible so I had to quit after 5 months when I was put in a evening rotation. I am a pretty strong student, perhaps because I love school. I love learning and think I have figured out study strategies that work for me. I will also more than likely take a "cushion" class as well.
  8. 0
    Thanks EllTee2B. I will add my self and look forward to meeting you!
  9. 0
    Quote from 240zRN
    Im an '11 graduate. Working part time is doable if you have solid study habits, but make sure your work is flexible with scheduling because clinical rotations can be unpredictable--you sometimes don't know where you will end up until last minute. I'd say the hardest time to work would be the second year, because of the constant 5-week rotation changing. Driving to the facility the night before for patient assignments is very time consuming. Care planning is time consuming. I saved some coin and quit my job when the program started, because I didn't want my grades to suffer. The job market these days makes lower GPA grads work harder to land jobs. If there's any way you can avoid working, don't work. If you MUST work, work part time. I only know of maybe 3 or 4 people who help full time jobs throughout the program, all of their grades suffered as a result but all managed to make it to the finish line. Good luck.
    Hi 240zRN,

    That is one thing I learned over the past 18 months is that I had to figure out what study habits worked for me, and I think I have it down. I just have to get past the first exam and familiar with the teaching styles of the professors and I should be good to go on that front. The unpredictability of rotations can sometimes be nerve racking. I remember one semester a hospital pulled out and some students were left with as you said, not knowing where they would go until the last minute. Do you not have clinical rotations during the 1st year? or were those rotations different in length than the 5-week rotation changes you mentioned in the 2nd year? Prep work, it was very informative, but after a while I couldn't wait to go blind! At what point in the program does the prep work end? Do employers really ask about your GPA??? Wow... And I MUST work, unfortunately... hopefully some of the theory and skills that I have gained as a LVN student will help me through this program while I work. Thanks for responding, it really helped.
  10. 0
    I'm graduating this December from CSUEB and I've worked the whole time... everyone is different. I worked 40hrs/wk most of the first year and this year I'm working about 30hrs/wk, but my job is super flexible and I have some time to study while I am there. I also don't have kids. I'm getting As.

    So it really depends on the particular job and your life situation.

    There are plenty of people in my class who are working and I haven't seen anyone really struggling because of it.

    The class schedule does change a lot, that's why it's only doable to work if your work is flexible with scheduling or you only work on weekends. In the first year, classes/clinicals are pretty much just M/T/W/Th daytime (unless you choose a PM clinical or are at the bottom of the priority list). In the 2nd year, the schedule is really erratic and changes every five weeks. My clinical schedules this year have been: M/W 3-930p, M/W 2-830p, F/Sa 7-130p, M/F 3-930p, M 3-7p/W 7-4p, M/W 7-130p. And then there's still lecture classes and skills lab and sim labs, usually on T/Th mornings or afternoons. The worst thing is having to go to the clinical site the day before to pick patients. You only have to do this in some of the rotations though, not all of them.

    You usually find out a month or two in advance about upcoming schedules, but then sometimes things change at the last minute.
  11. 0
    Carmieth,

    Two rotations the first year, there is a SNF rotation which i believe is 8 weeks, and a rotation on a med surg unit (I was on a tele step down, Kaiser Oakland) which is 10 weeks? Im not sure exactly on the length but they are box longer than the 5 week rotations seen in level 2. Yes, lots of employers asked for my GPA as well as official transcripts. Prep work ends after year 2. There is paperwork involved during the community rotation in level 3, but it isnt anywhere as painful as the care planning done during levels 1 and 2. Hint: SAVE YOUR WORK. Create a spreadsheet/table for medications, so you don't find yourself inputting the same data on every care plan. Sounds like you have experience as an LVN, you should do fine juggling work and school. Stay on top of deadlines and you will be just fine.


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