Any National University of San Diego RN Alumni out there? - page 2

by nurturebynature | 14,719 Views | 34 Comments

Hello! I'm currently taking the prereqs to apply to the nursing program and have done extensive research. There's one thing missing- feedback from alumni. I've scoured allnurses.com for alumni from National University of San... Read More


  1. 0
    Thanks Swede for replying.
  2. 0
    Quote from nurturebynature
    Hello! I'm currently taking the prereqs to apply to the nursing program and have done extensive research. There's one thing missing- feedback from alumni. I've scoured allnurses.com for alumni from National University of San Diego BSN prog but I haven't found had any luck . If you are an alumni please let me know how your experience went. Is there anything you wish someone told you before you began the BSN program? Is there anything you'd change? What was your favorite thing about NU? What was the most challenging and how did you overcome it? Please pass on your words of wisdom. Tips on TEAS, Essay, NCLEX... all feedback is welcome. Congrats on becoming an RN! :bowingpur
    Hi naturebynature, your situation sounded so similar to mine, I was hoping you wouldn't mind sharing with me a bit about your BSN experience at NU San Diego thus far? It would be greatly appreciated! I am married, turning 30 next year and very much want children soon. I knew I wanted to complete my BSN before starting my family (for so many reasons), not to mention this could be my last chance. I don't have a lot of time to waste (i.e comm college wait time or RN-BSN). Currently I have been accepted into Mt St Mary's Pre ADN program. I met with the advisor this week and she said I would not be able to transfer to the BSN at any time and that I would have to continue with a BSN at another college (and most require 1-2 years of Nursing exp!). Because of this and my ultimate goal of NICU Nurse (I would take OB, L&D) I am now back to NU Los Angeles. There have been great reviews and also some pretty terrible ones. A guy at my local NU info center has been so wonderful to me. However, like you, I have not been able to find any feedback from NU alumni; where they are now, how their journey was getting there, did they suffer with no preceptorship (my greatest concern). Have you heard of any alumni working in specialties or being accepted into new grad programs such as Cedars/KP/CHSD/CHLA? As I touched on, my dream is to work in the NICU. I feel not having a preceptorship really hurts my chances at this specialty. Sorry for the rant but my main question to you is, considering the experience you have at NU thus far, how do you find NU students are viewed against MSMC/UCLA students etc. Which hospitals do you complete your rotations? With a NU degree would I be a contender for new grad programs in the NICU etc? Would you steer me toward an Associates degree at MSMC at all? I am still skeptical of the whole ADN vs BSN debate. I am not afraid of full time, hard work and I am not looking for a social life. I just want to make sure I can get a great job once I'm done. Thank you so much for reading this and I wish you the best of luck with your degree. Maybe see you around.. ! Best
  3. 1
    Hi there. I went to NU, but I didn't have to take the TEAS to enter the program. I started in 2009 and there was little competition then for entry. I have a BS degree from SDSU and worked in a related field for nearly 10 years before starting my journey into nursing. The program was extremely unorganized in some areas and ok in others. Clinical times and dates were always changing enabling staff to use the "nurses have to be flexible" adage over and over again. Back then, ATI was just a supplement to the classes and we took a test at the end of each final for extra credit based on score. I'm hearing now that the ATI is a requirement for passing each class. It was changed because the NCLEX passing rate was so low. Also, most of the clinical and lecture instructors were fantastic with the exception of a few...this is the case for any school though. Clinicals are held all over San Diego which is a plus. Students are exposed to different hospital systems. I chose the "night" cohort which worked out great for family time and I preferred the two 12 hour days a week clinicals as opposed to 3 or 4 eight hour days at a different school.

    I think the worst part was the fact that NU doesn't provide a preceptorship as part of their curriculum. This is a great disservice to students esp. when we pay so much for the program. When I was there, NU contracted through Southwestern to take a class that enabled students to find "preceptorships" on their own. It was discontinued though during my class. Not sure if anything else was started after that. For any NU students, I would definitely encourage finding a job working as a tech or NA while in school. At least you are able to network and already work for a potential employer. It's one foot through the door. Most of the students from my class found full time work in hospitals by doing this, but this was over a year ago.

    I've heard that NU students are viewed as being more mature and hard workers (most of us were older with second degrees), but the managers who hired me specifically mentioned that they know NU students don't have a preceptorships and they tend to shy away from these applications. I felt somewhat prepared for "real life" after attending NU, but no school can prepare you for the idiosyncrasies of daily bed side nursing no matter what. Now that competition is so fierce for jobs, getting in and out of a BSN program quickly is key, but you must maintain a very high GPA (3.6 or above) because employers are looking at that as a source of weeding out applicants. Studying 4-5 hours a night is a must and yes, sometimes it feels like short term memory commitment, but you do what you have to. It would be highly impossible to work full time while attending NU. Your grades will suffer as well as other aspects of your life. The program is just way too intense.
    dorkypanda likes this.
  4. 0
    Thanks so much for your feedback sd-ace. I attended an information forum at the LA campus today. My biggest fear is no preceptorship, however I feel that the BSN will be more advantageous to me in the long run, due to my hopes to specialize. I have decided to pass up the ADN at Mt St Mary's and go with NU. I hope I am making the right decision! I volunteer at a NICU where NU do some of their rotations, so hopefully this will help me to network during the course of my degree. I graduated from high school 12 years ago and am a little worried how I am going to grade but as you say, you do what you have to do. Did you go on to obtain your RN license through National? Thank you again for your insight to NU!
  5. 1
    Definitely do the BSN. There are a lot of hospitals that require a BSN because the pool of applicants is so large. Also, with a lot of hospitals seeking magnet status, all nurses are encouraged to obtain their BSN if they don't already have one. That is great that you volunteer. I volunteered at my current hospital and even work on the same floor now. Great way to network. The good thing about NU unlike other schools is that you can focus on one subject at a time instead of taking a full load of classes like a state school. I really liked having only peds or OB to study at a time. Because the curriculum has changed at NU, I believe you are required to take the ATI tests each class for a passing grade. If you already have a degree, you can sit for the NCLEX RN license exam after you complete you core nursing classes (before actually graduating with the BSN). If you don't have a bachelor's already, you should def. sit for the exam after graduating. I went NU in San Diego so I'm not too familiar with the LA program. Good luck!
    dorkypanda likes this.
  6. 0
    Thank you so, so much sd-ace! I can not tell you how much your words have helped and encouraged me at such an important time. I am very excited to attend NU. I think that the one subject at a time format will work so well for me. I can't really even fathom taking a full load of classes like state school. I love volunteering and am also at an ER, however may have to drop that shift and stick with only the NICU (due to the intensity of the course). You are proof that volunteers have fruitful relationships and are often snapped up. I know plenty who have been hired and have no doubt this will be my best chance for a foot in the door at Kaiser. Your advice re the BSN has been more than fantastic. It really could have gone either way for me. Thank you so much and I wish you all the very best
  7. 1
    No problem! I just wish I had somebody to explain things to me at the time. Had to figure everything out with the help of my classmates. Yes, I agree about forming relationships while volunteering. Working part time for the hospital is even better if you can swing it. My hospital gave some preferential treatment to volunteers and employees by screening those application first before the outside which helps a lot. Kaiser is notorious for internal hires and they encourage education beyond RN licensure. They like to retain their talent. Nursing school is a long journey, but if you are committed it will be rewarding in many ways. Best of luck to you!
    dorkypanda likes this.
  8. 0
    Quote from nurturebynature
    Hello! I'm currently taking the prereqs to apply to the nursing program and have done extensive research. There's one thing missing- feedback from alumni. I've scoured allnurses.com for alumni from National University of San Diego BSN prog but I haven't found had any luck . If you are an alumni please let me know how your experience went. Is there anything you wish someone told you before you began the BSN program? Is there anything you'd change? What was your favorite thing about NU? What was the most challenging and how did you overcome it? Please pass on your words of wisdom. Tips on TEAS, Essay, NCLEX... all feedback is welcome. Congrats on becoming an RN! :bowingpur
    I just started taking my pre-reqs at NU. I have been a CNA for three years and recently got job at Palomar Medical Center in Escondido. Have you started the nursing program? Did you take the TEAS test already? So far my english 101 has been easy. The instroctor is nice and realy has us working for that A.... Hope to hear from you soon
  9. 2
    I am an alumni. I just finished the program this year. The program changed and we just got a new director who is awesome. I got many job offers before I even graduated from the ER to Nursing informatics. You make it what it is. I would recommend the program if you want to finish fast. Thats my two cents... Study hard and play hard.
    dorkypanda and GamerGal like this.
  10. 0
    I am a current NU student. Go somewhere else. Trust me. There is a very large disconnect to what is being taught here to what is practiced now in the hospitals, dated approaches to care plans for example. Teachers here take pride in majority of the class failing, don't care if 12 or more students are left behind, and fail to see that if half your class is failing YOUR failing as a teacher.

    Clinical instructors are a mixed bag, you either get one you wish you could clone and teach every class, or the others who already work in the hospital and teach a clinical on the side in which they come down on you like a hammer for everything regardless that working Nurses your following are illustrating real working order and you are instructed to know out dated care planning and doctorate level drug information.

    You have to save all your emails from any professor to cover your ass because they will change things or say otherwise at will. Uniformity there is none, orgainization zero, teachers who can educate you and provide it in a positive manner without constantly reminding you that you will be dropped or failed on the fly, slim to none.

    The positives Do Not Out weight the negatives here, it's you against them, your self taught and paying them to tell you over and over "here at National are MANY ways to fail, but only one way to succeed " which is to studying until you bleed out the ears and eyes and pray your teacher didn't write her own test based on his/her antiquated view of what constitutes nursing.

    So if you want a really expensive, unsupportive experience, that will not even make an attempt to hide the pure business machine that this school is, care about your $ not your success, then by all means come on down.


Nursing Jobs in every specialty and state. Visit today and Create Job Alerts, Manage Your Resume, and Apply for Jobs.

A Big Thank You To Our Sponsors
Top