ER RN to BICU RN!

  1. Hi all!

    I just finished a my two-year commitment to the hospital where I did by StaRN apprenticeship at in the ER. While it was an amazing experience, I knew I did not want to stay there longterm, because I had to live 2.5 hrs away from my fiancee. I got offered a job at my state's highest acuity BICU in the hospital where my fiancee works (not directly, he works in administration) and I am so ecstatick to have that change! But, I'm also nervous. I know next to nothing about burn care/what to expect. He was only able to get me the job because it was the only unit with an open position for someone with relatively little experience.

    So...could you give me a run down? What should I brush up on? Any helpful tips?

    Thank you very much in advance!
    •  
  2. Visit nursemaryzzel profile page

    About nursemaryzzel, BSN, RN

    Joined: Dec '17; Posts: 28; Likes: 91

    3 Comments

  3. by   Pixie.RN
    Have you ever taken ABLS? What kind of education/orientation are they offering you?

    Our new burn nurses go through a rigorous orientation and critical care course, even if you have been an RN for a while in another specialty. It's a lot to learn! These are typically sick, sick folks unless you are in the stepdown or burn med/surg areas. But BICUs tend to have their own protocols and procedures, so much of what you learn will be on the job.

    Good luck!!!
  4. by   nursemaryzzel
    Quote from Pixie.RN
    Have you ever taken ABLS? What kind of education/orientation are they offering you?

    Our new burn nurses go through a rigorous orientation and critical care course, even if you have been an RN for a while in another specialty. It's a lot to learn! These are typically sick, sick folks unless you are in the stepdown or burn med/surg areas. But BICUs tend to have their own protocols and procedures, so much of what you learn will be on the job.

    Good luck!!!
    I haven't taken ABLS, but my future workplace requires it within 6 months of hire. So I plan to do it sooner rather than later. The nurse manager said my orientation would be intensive and last anywhere from 12-16 weeks, until my preceptor and I feel comfortable that I am competent enough to have my own patients.

    I'm really excited for this opportunity! Thank you for your insight!
  5. by   WestCoastSunRN
    Hi NurseMary! Welcome to burns! If you scroll down in this burn forum, you can find some good advice for the new burn nurse -- so instead of restating all of that, I'll just direct you there.

    But I will say, I am so excited for you! Burns is an awesome specialty. It's definitely not for everyone, but there are plenty of career burn nurses out there -- well maybe not 'plenty'. One of the interesting things about this specialty is that the actual numbers of burn team members across the nation is quite low compared to trauma, in general. So you are entering into a highly specialized field! That has it's pros and cons..... but mostly pros. You'll be able to hold your own in any ICU environment plus you will have extensive wound care knowledge. And you will see not only burns but a variety of nasty flesh-eating/sloughing diseases and you and your team will know what to do about it!

    Coming from ED, this will be a very different experience for you. You will have these patients not just for a few hours but for months at times.

    It's messy, exhausting work, and it can be traumatic .... but still I enjoy high job satisfaction (as do most I work with). Even if you don't decide to stay in burns forever, this will be second-to-none experience for you!

close