Scottsdale Healthcare and Scottsdale Community College

  1. Are any of you students out there in the SHC program at Scottsdale CC? If so, what is your current position at SHC and how low did you work there before you applied for the program? Are they flexible with your work hours to accomodate your school hours?

    I am a pre-nursing student, and have been planning on applying to the Banner program, however, I talked to a client today who works for SHC and she told me about their program through Scottsdale CC. I know you have to be an employee, which I am currently not. The only problem I can see is telling them I am applying for a job so that I can get into the nursing program. Obviously, that would mean I don't plan to stay in that job. Not sure how they would like that. What experience have you had?

    Also, what is the difference between an CNA and a patient care tech? If any of you are CNA's and/or patient care techs @ SHC, would you mind sharing what the salary is?

    I look forward to any feedback!

    Thanks!
    chihmom8
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  2. 12 Comments

  3. by   suzanne4
    Most of these programs have requirements that you have been an employee there for a period of one year before you can apply to the program. And they expect you to remain at the facility in the role of the RN for a certain period of time after you complete your training.

    Suggest that you check with them before you start any planning, it is always better to do it that way and know where you stand with them..

    I can say that they were great facilities to work at, prefer them over most of the others in the Valley.
  4. by   TinkRN8
    Quote from suzanne4
    Most of these programs have requirements that you have been an employee there for a period of one year before you can apply to the program. And they expect you to remain at the facility in the role of the RN for a certain period of time after you complete your training.

    Suggest that you check with them before you start any planning, it is always better to do it that way and know where you stand with them..

    I can say that they were great facilities to work at, prefer them over most of the others in the Valley.
    Suzanne4,

    Thanks. That is why I was checking first, before I made any changes to current plans.It was put out there, and thought I would find out more about it. Plus, I couldn't find any info on the program anywhere, so that was telling me it wasn't just a cut and dry thing. Just wanted to explore all the options out there. SHC is a great organization, that I do know from recent personal experience as a patient. I haven't really ever heard a complaint about them. Although, at this rate, it may be well over a year before I can even get into an MCCD nursing program, so it could still be an option.
  5. by   Knorremeisje
    I don't work at SHC but I have been a PCT for about 6 months elsewhere. CNA's perform basic patient care, such as transferring the patient, setting the patient up for meals, help feed the patient, help the patient with his bath, etc. PCT's are trained to do those things plus a few other things, for me that was inserting/dc'ing Foley catheters, sterile procedures (needed for the Foley catheter), dc'ing regular heplocked IV's, and taking 12-lead EKG's. I've heard of PCT's that are trained as phlebotomists, as well.

    The pay is not exactly high, I started out with no experience at about $11/hr. It IS hard work and you have stay on your feet for 12hrs, I got a total of 45 minutes break (15 for breakfast, 30 for lunch) and I saw a lot of nasty things (my last day as a PCT a patient actually voided on my shoes and pants). But at the same time it is excellent experience when you want to become an RN. You get direct patient experience, and you see so many interesting things. In the end it is totally worth it for a while, I would just not recommend it as a career in itself.

    Good luck! I hope you find the right program!
  6. by   TinkRN8
    Quote from Knorremeisje
    I don't work at SHC but I have been a PCT for about 6 months elsewhere. CNA's perform basic patient care, such as transferring the patient, setting the patient up for meals, help feed the patient, help the patient with his bath, etc. PCT's are trained to do those things plus a few other things, for me that was inserting/dc'ing Foley catheters, sterile procedures (needed for the Foley catheter), dc'ing regular heplocked IV's, and taking 12-lead EKG's. I've heard of PCT's that are trained as phlebotomists, as well.

    The pay is not exactly high, I started out with no experience at about $11/hr. It IS hard work and you have stay on your feet for 12hrs, I got a total of 45 minutes break (15 for breakfast, 30 for lunch) and I saw a lot of nasty things (my last day as a PCT a patient actually voided on my shoes and pants). But at the same time it is excellent experience when you want to become an RN. You get direct patient experience, and you see so many interesting things. In the end it is totally worth it for a while, I would just not recommend it as a career in itself.

    Good luck! I hope you find the right program!

    Thanks Knorremeisje!

    Yeah, I wasn't planning it as a career, just as a stepping stone for being an RN. I have no real healthcare experience, other than being a patient, so I am considering at least getting my feet wet (no pun intended :spin:, while I am waiting to finish my pre-req's & then waiting to get into one of the MCCD programs. Wow, I didn't realize the PCT's did so much! Where did you get your training for that? Did the hospital you worked for do the training program? Thanks again for the info!

    Rachael.
  7. by   Knorremeisje
    I got my CNA training at a nursing home for free, I then waited about three weeks to take my state board test and got my licence shortly after that. I got a job about two weeks after I put myself "on the market". I got trained to be a PCT at the hospital during an extra day of orientation. You then basically get signed off for those four extra tasks during the rest of your orientation.

    It's definitely a good way to get some clinical experience. After 6 months of PCT work, I changed to become a Unit Secretary/Monitor Tech. Also very good paperwork experience, you get to read doctor's orders and put them in the computer system, I'm also trained in basic EKG interpretation so I watch the heart monitors and print out the strips as well. I think the combination of PCT and US/MT is the best way to gain an all-round experience before nursing school.

    Let me know if you have any other questions! And again, best of luck!

    (I'm off to take my A&PI midterm, so wish me some luck as well! )
  8. by   TinkRN8
    Quote from Knorremeisje
    I got my CNA training at a nursing home for free, I then waited about three weeks to take my state board test and got my licence shortly after that. I got a job about two weeks after I put myself "on the market". I got trained to be a PCT at the hospital during an extra day of orientation. You then basically get signed off for those four extra tasks during the rest of your orientation.

    It's definitely a good way to get some clinical experience. After 6 months of PCT work, I changed to become a Unit Secretary/Monitor Tech. Also very good paperwork experience, you get to read doctor's orders and put them in the computer system, I'm also trained in basic EKG interpretation so I watch the heart monitors and print out the strips as well. I think the combination of PCT and US/MT is the best way to gain an all-round experience before nursing school.

    Let me know if you have any other questions! And again, best of luck!

    (I'm off to take my A&PI midterm, so wish me some luck as well! )

    Great info! If you don't mind telling me, was it a Banner hospital you work for? So, they just trained you for the PCT certification once you were hired as a CNA? Did you just contact a nursing home about the CNA course?

    Good luck with your midterm!
  9. by   Knorremeisje
    I will send you a PM with the hospital and more info on their training.

    Actually I just opened the news paper and found a nursing home in there. I think a couple of nursing homes around the valley offer the CNA class. Of course they expect you to work for them, but you don't have to sign any contract that binds you to them after your class is over.

    My midterm went well! Jeuj! I got a great B on the multiple choice part, and the essay part went great so I'm hopeful! I really do want to end this class with an A! I guess I have another eight weeks to do so!
  10. by   TinkRN8
    Quote from Knorremeisje
    I will send you a PM with the hospital and more info on their training.

    Actually I just opened the news paper and found a nursing home in there. I think a couple of nursing homes around the valley offer the CNA class. Of course they expect you to work for them, but you don't have to sign any contract that binds you to them after your class is over.

    My midterm went well! Jeuj! I got a great B on the multiple choice part, and the essay part went great so I'm hopeful! I really do want to end this class with an A! I guess I have another eight weeks to do so!
    Thanks, I will appreciate the info. Congrats on the midterm! I am starting A&PI Jan 7. I have my microbio final next Saturday. I too am looking to get an A in that class. I have an 89% in the class right now, so need an A on that final to get an A in the class. It is always such a relief when those tests are over!

    Thanks again for all of your help!
  11. by   Knorremeisje
    Sure! I'm glad to help whenever I can!

    Good job on your Microbiology! I'm starting that one on Jan 7th! Where are you taking your pre-req's?
  12. by   TinkRN8
    I have been taking them all through Rio. I LOVED my microbio class. The only thing I didn't like is that we are just now getting into the "good stuff", like epidemeology, immunology, etc. and now the class is over. The class is more of a general overview of microbiology. I actually asked my professor if there were any other classes that go into the more advanced microbio. Unfortunately, there are none through MCCD. Maybe I am just wierd! I just found it so interesting because I was in the hospital for 2.5 wks and then on 8 wks home health care over the summer for an Enterococcal infection. So, it was kinda' cool to learn about this stuff, since I was personally affected by it. Good luck with the class, I hope you enjoy it as much as I did!
  13. by   sunnshyne86
    I actually started out as a NA (nursing assistant) at SHC in 2004. I then got my "certification" from the board so I became a CNA. SHC trained me to be a PCT 2 (patient care tech). This just meant that I could draw blood, I was a monitor tech, could splint patients, etc.

    Also, I completed my RN program through SHC/Scotts Comm College fellowship in 16 months. I had not worked at SHC for a year - there is no minimum time requirement at all. You just need to mark "SHC cohort" as your first choice on your Scottsdale Community College application. Also, after I graduated as an RN, I left to go work for a different hospital (and then ultimately came back to SHC). However, Scottsdale Healthcare has NO contracts or anything. They pay for your school and work around your schedule while you are in nursing school. I only worked 16 hours per week and still got benefits for myself and my son. I love Scottsdale Healthcare. I have been an RN now for 16 months and came back to SHC in August after being gone for almost a year.

    Hope that helps!
  14. by   TinkRN8
    Quote from sunnshyne86
    I actually started out as a NA (nursing assistant) at SHC in 2004. I then got my "certification" from the board so I became a CNA. SHC trained me to be a PCT 2 (patient care tech). This just meant that I could draw blood, I was a monitor tech, could splint patients, etc.

    Also, I completed my RN program through SHC/Scotts Comm College fellowship in 16 months. I had not worked at SHC for a year - there is no minimum time requirement at all. You just need to mark "SHC cohort" as your first choice on your Scottsdale Community College application. Also, after I graduated as an RN, I left to go work for a different hospital (and then ultimately came back to SHC). However, Scottsdale Healthcare has NO contracts or anything. They pay for your school and work around your schedule while you are in nursing school. I only worked 16 hours per week and still got benefits for myself and my son. I love Scottsdale Healthcare. I have been an RN now for 16 months and came back to SHC in August after being gone for almost a year.

    Hope that helps!

    Sunnshyne86,

    You helped immensely! Thank you so much for the info. You have really helped me in making some decisions. I appreciate it. The Banner hospitals are much more convenient for me, however, you just have to jump through so many hoops to get into their program. BNF will still be an option, but I think that it will probably be more feasable to pursue the SHC option. I do like SHC, as they are so student and nurse friendly. I have been very impressed with them. It will just be a very long drive. But I will do what I have to. Have you chosen a specialty? The only hesitation I really have about SHC, is that I want to go into NICU or pediatrics, and I know that those are not areas that SHC really focuses on. When I was at the Shea campus for my surgery in May, I was sent to the pediatric unit for recovery, as it was empty so that was where they were putting adult overflow. So, that is kind of a concern.
    Were you able to get into the nursing program pretty quickly through SHC, or is there a "waiting list" with that as well. I know SCC holds open a good chunk of spots for SHC. Do you know if they are always filled? You can pm me if you would rather.
    Thanks again for the info!:spin:

    chihmom8

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