I need some advice...PLEASE

  1. 0
    This is the BIG question for many RN program hopefuls.

    I am finally on the list...well, I submitted my application back at the beginning of March but time stamps are done April 15th. Yay for more waiting!

    My dilemma, like many I am sure, is this: I need a job. I haven't worked for nearly 3 years devoting my time to school FT. So during these 2+ years, what do I do?? Do I just wait my time working anywhere because the likelihood of getting a medical job is non existent? ((How is it that I meet all these Banner employees finishing RN pre req's, with no prior exp but the moment I look for a Banner job, all require exp??, what am I missing?))
    I want a job in healthcare, anything! so that MAYBE I can have some chance of getting a job via networking when I am officially an RN??
    OR...
    DO I go for the LPN program and try and get into block 3 when I graduate?

    I asked ---- at EMCC about possibly going LPN-RN and starting the LPN program, anywhere, ASAP!! She advised me against it and said that most LPN's who apply to the 3rd block can't hang and fail because LPN school is very different than RN school, which I understand. What I don't understand is why am I an LPN after 2 semesters of RN school but we have different education when compared later? THAT doesn't make sense to me.
    I think I will go this route because when its all said and done, I'll have a skill as an LPN if for some reason nurses aren't in demand. I have to say, I see a lot more jobs for LPN when compared to RN jobs that require no experience.

    So, most LPN programs require I am a CNA first, right? Where can I go to acquire my CNA training w/o a year wait also?
    This is getting to be absolutely ridiculous when I think about how much time has, is, and will go by.
    Last edit by dianah on Apr 14, '11 : Reason: Terms of Service re: posting names
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  3. 9 Comments so far...

  4. 1
    Wow, what a novel! :-)
    If I were you I would do your prereqs for the NAU concurrent program asap and get on that list. I've seen a trend that hospitals are looking for the BSN. I would also look at GCU (there is financial aid etc) you can fast track a BSN in 5 semesters.
    If you need a job I would look for the highest paying (save your money so you don't have to work through nursing school and can afford a housekeeper and landscaper- you won't have time for those things)
    What you're "missing" about the Banner people is that it's all about networking! It's who you know to get an interview. If you're desperate for a hospital job then begin by volunteering. Many hospitals hire their volunteers. :-)
    There are waits for the LPN programs also. Put your name on as many lists as you can!
    CNA classes are at the community colleges or you can go private. I went to RSAA in Mesa and felt very prepared and passed my state boards with flying colors.
    I hope I addressed all of your concerns. Good luck!
    RN2b23 likes this.
  5. 1
    OMG that is SOOOOO not true about the LPN route to RN. Everyone I know that went to Gateway Fasttrack that has gone on to Block 3 has passed or is about to graduate.

    The traditional RN program does not have the option to become an LPN after the first two semesters anymore. Because they don't cover all the material that you need for the NCLEX-PN. The LPN program contains Peds, Maternity and Psych in addition to Fundamentals and Med-Surg 1.

    The skills in Block 1 & 2 are the same that you learn in LPN as in the RN program. You may even learn more with the inclusion of the IV certification portion in the LPN program.
    RN2b23 likes this.
  6. 0
    Your comment worries me about LPN's not being able to do it in block 3 of the program. I met with that advisor at EMCC, and she told me that the LPN to RN route would be the fastest way to get in even if there was 1 semester wait in between. I think in my case, this is the most economical way to do things, and since I already have a bachelors, I figured I could just do the RN associates route after doing the LPN classes. This is making me worrry!
  7. 0
    Matt's Girl: Thank you for the insight. I never thought of volunteering. I didn't know the hospitals still did this. That is Great!
    I JUST signed up today for an info session that became available for NAU. I will check on what other pre req's I need now.
    I also didn't know I could be on any more wait lists apart from EMCC. My advisor hasn't told me a lot that I have come to find out. I know I need to be researching this. This is the only way I know how as I am not from here and don't know any nurses or hopefuls here either.
    Thank you for th tip on RSAA, I will be looking into that as well. You have helped me out immensely. Thank you

    AZMOMO2: I have read that a lot of people on here go that route. Allnurses is how I found out about LPN and the 3rd block and what not. Your post puts a lot of fears I had at bay, Thank you!

    Miteacher:
    I wouldn't worry after reading the post before yours. She really set concerns aside. I don't know why the advisor at EMCC told me what she did. It was just in March. Maybe she just thought I couldn't hang? I have a perfect GPA so I don't know.
  8. 0
    Hi kouklasou

    From what I have heard from many students who did the LPN-RN route from the southwest skill center and then went on to EMCC the transition is really difficult. She wasn't lying to you when she told you many students who went that route didn't make it past block 3.

    I decided to become an LPN after completing block 2 of the RN program. They require you to take a short (I think it was approx. 3 weeks) LPN bridge course (NUR 191) and then you can take NCLEX-PN. Although, the course is very short, it definitely helps get you ready for Block 3.

    Here are some ideas:
    1) Take classes that will transfer to a university for your BSN (thats if your planning on getting that).
    2) I would recommend taking a pathophysiology class if you haven't already (you will be VERY happy you did later)
    3)Other classes I found helpful were healthcare spanish and food and nutrition (FON241)
    3)Many of my instructors recommend getting ANY job you can in a hospital (i.e. housekeeping, food services, patient care tech., unit secretary) because it will increase your chances of getting a job after your graduate.


    I hope this helps good luck!
  9. 0
    Quote from Trina0606
    Hi kouklasou

    From what I have heard from many students who did the LPN-RN route from the southwest skill center and then went on to EMCC the transition is really difficult. She wasn't lying to you when she told you many students who went that route didn't make it past block 3.

    I decided to become an LPN after completing block 2 of the RN program. They require you to take a short (I think it was approx. 3 weeks) LPN bridge course (NUR 191) and then you can take NCLEX-PN. Although, the course is very short, it definitely helps get you ready for Block 3.

    Here are some ideas:
    1) Take classes that will transfer to a university for your BSN (thats if your planning on getting that).
    2) I would recommend taking a pathophysiology class if you haven't already (you will be VERY happy you did later)
    3)Other classes I found helpful were healthcare spanish and food and nutrition (FON241)
    3)Many of my instructors recommend getting ANY job you can in a hospital (i.e. housekeeping, food services, patient care tech., unit secretary) because it will increase your chances of getting a job after your graduate.


    I hope this helps good luck!
    So do you think there is a difference between the Southwest Skills Center LPN and Gateway Fast Track LPN? Or are they the same?
  10. 0
    I honestly wouldn't know everything I heard was strictly word of mouth and I haven't attended either so I really couldn't say sorry .
  11. 1
    I know why she told you what she did... because EVERYONE has found this route into the RN program. It's a good and bad thing. Its not advised, because it can disrupt the flow of the traditional program, but Advanced Placement has been around for awhile. Its a much shorter route into the program and I personally have found that it actually was the best option, since I could become an LPN and work making AWESOME money while going back for my RN.

    I am applying into the Spring Block 3 myself. I would have been able to roll right into Block 3 when I completed my LPN year, but I had a few classes to finish, and I really needed to work for awhile. I have a friend from my LPN class who did the same as I did. Took 1 year to work, get money and is about to finish Block 3 right now, she has a great grade, and was invited to be in the accelerated summer program to finish Block 4. ( She is not the first)

    You can do it!
    RN2b23 likes this.
  12. 0
    Quote from AZMOMO2
    I know why she told you what she did... because EVERYONE has found this route into the RN program. It's a good and bad thing. Its not advised, because it can disrupt the flow of the traditional program, but Advanced Placement has been around for awhile. Its a much shorter route into the program and I personally have found that it actually was the best option, since I could become an LPN and work making AWESOME money while going back for my RN.

    I am applying into the Spring Block 3 myself. I would have been able to roll right into Block 3 when I completed my LPN year, but I had a few classes to finish, and I really needed to work for awhile. I have a friend from my LPN class who did the same as I did. Took 1 year to work, get money and is about to finish Block 3 right now, she has a great grade, and was invited to be in the accelerated summer program to finish Block 4. ( She is not the first)

    You can do it!
    AZMOMo2,
    Is Gateway the only one that offers the accelerated program or are there other programs that are also accelerated? I was also wondering if you had to do anything extra since you did not start block 3 right away. I thought I read somewhere that your medication or drugs class or something had to be current and that you had to have taken it within a certain amount of time. Did you get in to block 3 right away? Where are you doing block 3?

    I think a lot of people have discovered that this is a faster way than waiting on the RN waiting list. I met with that same advisor about a year ago, and she told me this would be the fastest way to do it. She said otherwise, I could plan on waiting for 2 years, and then another 2 years in the program versus starting Gateway after 1 or 2 semesters and then possibly waiting 1 semester in between blocks 2 and 3, which would still be faster than doing it the traditional way. I only waited 1 semester to get into Gateway, so I still think this route is much better anyway. I also figured if I really had to, I could apply for advanced placement elsewhere in Arizona or Michigan. I'm hoping to do the LPN, then get into the accelerated program and move back to Michigan as soon as I finish up....


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