CNA ratio to patient

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    Can anyone tell me in a SNIF unit what the ratio of CNA's to patients is? Does 21 seem too many? Where can I find this information?
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  3. 8 Comments so far...

  4. 0
    I have no knowledge of legally-mandated ratios for CNAs. However, I can tell you that I work at a nursing home. There are 80 patients on my particular unit, split between 6 CNAs. It adds up to about 13-14 patients per CNA.
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    Quote from TheCommuter
    I have no knowledge of legally-mandated ratios for CNAs. However, I can tell you that I work at a nursing home. There are 80 patients on my particular unit, split between 6 CNAs. It adds up to about 13-14 patients per CNA.

    Neither do I, but 13-14 pts per aide??? I don't work in LTC, but on med/surg and the thought of bathing 13 pts, answering lights, turning, passing trays, feeding, accuchecks, vitals, etc is mind boggling. How do they get it all done? You alone do not have 80 pts, right?

    I've had 13 pts on med surg before and pts did not get good care. But, we are expected to change every pts linens everyday regardless. I don't think that's the case in LTC. And I think working LTC is more grueling - more residents to get up, more time consuming.

    God bless those who do LTC.
  6. 0
    Quote from linda8532
    Can anyone tell me in a SNIF unit what the ratio of CNA's to patients is? Does 21 seem too many? Where can I find this information?
    21 seems pretty heavy to me. When working med-surg as an assistant, day shift had 3-4 per 22 patients, evening 2-3, nights 2. The highest number I ever took care of was when I was pulled to another floor and was given 12 patients.
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    I worked one night as a CNA for med/surg and had 30 patients. It was my first night as a CNA, working for a registry, and it was overwhelming. Most of the nurses ended up taking their own patients, but it still left me with 15 pt's, most of whom were CBR. I thought that working at night I wouldn't be as busy, boy was I wrong. No, I didn't have to do baths or anything, but people go to the bathroom all night long, they eat at various times during the night, it was pretty busy. I'm pretty sure that 15 patients on nights was the norm though, 'cause there were supposed to be two CNA's, I was the only one who showed up though.
    Keli
  8. 0
    Quote from bethin
    Neither do I, but 13-14 pts per aide??? I don't work in LTC, but on med/surg and the thought of bathing 13 pts, answering lights, turning, passing trays, feeding, accuchecks, vitals, etc is mind boggling. How do they get it all done? You alone do not have 80 pts, right?
    I must admit that our aides work extremely hard and should be paid more money than $9 per hour.

    Our elderly residents do not receive baths every day. Some residents receive baths on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays during the 6-2pm shift, while others receive baths on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays during the 2-10pm shift. Some residents receive baths on Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Saturdays during the 6-2pm shift, while others receive baths on Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Saturdays during the 2-10pm shift. Therefore, our bath schedule is spread out.

    Our CNAs do not do accuchecks, as that is the responsibility of the licensed nurse at my workplace. Also, our CNAs do not obtain vitals.

    I do not care for 80 patients by myself. The 80 patients are split between 4 nurses, and I happen to be one of the 4 nurses.
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    jAN 2007 THE LAW CHANGED , SEARCH KEY WORDS ARE
    MEDICAID/ MEDICARE NURSING HOME STAFFING, MINIMUM DIRECT CARE
    yOU COUNT AS DIRECT NURSING CARE
    GOES LIKE THIS
    30 PATIENTS DIVIDED BY DIRECT CARE WORKERS HOURS IN A 24 HOUR PERIOD MEANING IF 3 NURSES ON UNIT FOR 24 HOURS AND 3 CNA=6x8=48 HOURS DIVIDED BY 30=1.6 THIS IS POSTED hprd 1.6 which is absolutely illegal. But I believe starting Jan 1st all states have a minimum from 11pm-7am of no more than 20 pts per CNA
    Check you states Health Care Administration
    ps- CMS=medicaid reimbursement monitoring only tracks the payroll hours and believes that is adequate to prove direct care
    Administrative duties can NOT Count!!!
    May have someone illegally on the clock
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    CMS=Medicaid/Medicare Bill stated minimum diect care hours
    CMS gave this responsibility to Heathcare Administration
    The Healthcare Administration is taking tax payers money to instruct the State Surveyors to check Minimum direct care
    I phoned Florida State, they said They have no such instructions
    they determine if adequate staffing by measuring "initiatives" Such as.....
    Did all residents get their Flu Vacinations
    Million spent on Goverment study from 1990-2004 to prove there were not enough staff and still Goverment agencies are collecting
    So sad! Just spend the money on CNA's and Nurses and it would have been resolved now and well into the future
    I hope CNA's All Get toether an join ONE UNION!!!!!
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    I work in a facility that accepts no medicaid patients, it is strictly medicare/private insurance/private pay. I work the skilled side which means they are only there until their medicare/insurance runs out. Most are hips, fractured bones, strokes, mainly rehab patients. I work the night shift and total capcity for my side is 22. This includes IV's, central lines, tube feeds, accu checks, extensive dressing changes, to include admits after 6pm. I have one aide with me from 6pm-6am. It just seems an awful lot for her to do and that is why I asked if anyone knew the patient ratio. Most are fresh surgicals that are two people transfers. I try to help as much as I can but often go home feeling guilty that I didn't do more.


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