ASU Nursing Program

  1. 0
    So basically the advisor told me that I needed a 3.6 GPA or higher. But after the winter classes I'm taking I might have a 3.553 and she said the lowest that got in was a 3.583 with a 100% on the NET. Is anyone in the program now? Is it worth taking my classes over?

    Get the hottest topics every week!

    Subscribe to our free Nursing Insights newsletter.

  2. 18 Comments...

  3. 0
    I did not get in to ASU for Spring. You GPA is very similar to mine. I do know that ASU cut back faculity and is limiting the space at Poly and West campuses. They are trying to funnel everyone Downtown, which limits seats. Its very competative. To take classes over, they have to be a higher level than what you took, you can't just retake the same one (ie. Chem 151 replaces Chem 130). There are a few threads in the forum about it. If I were you, I would get on the MCCCD waitlist ASAP if you aren't and then apply to the Banner Fellows Program. Good Luck!
  4. 0
    Thanks. I probably should get on the maricopa waiting list. It's just that I want a bachlors degree at some point to have something to show for ya know? plus i think you might get paid more with a BSN? perhaps I'm wrong though. Also, they are building another building right next to the ASU downtown one, I read that they are expanding? So then maybe they will get more spaces?
  5. 0
    Quote from valerie87
    Thanks. I probably should get on the maricopa waiting list. It's just that I want a bachlors degree at some point to have something to show for ya know? plus i think you might get paid more with a BSN? perhaps I'm wrong though. Also, they are building another building right next to the ASU downtown one, I read that they are expanding? So then maybe they will get more spaces?
    The BSN pay differential is minimal at the few hospitals that even offer one. Most hospitals have onsite bridge programs - ADN to BSN - where you can get done in 14 months. ASU may be constructing a new building, but they are cutting done on the number of nursing slots in the short-term due to financial reasons (they lose money on nursing students). So a new building has nothing to do with how many slots are available for students.

    I would personally get my name in as many programs as possible (ADN, BSN, etc.).
  6. 0
    How do you know that the pay is not that different? Do you or anyone you personally know have a BSN? And is it based on starting pay versus overall? I just know that employeers pay more in general when you have obtained a bachlor's of some sort. I would assume that this wouldn't be any different?
  7. 0
    An RN is an RN whether they have an AS degree or a BS degree. Some hospitals pay a little extra for having a bachelors degree (a couple of dollars at most) but most pay the same. If you want to go into management then having a BS is necessary, but so is experience. I am going to be starting an ADN program in the spring on the advice of my sister (who is an RN, nurse manager of an ICU and clinical instructor at a CC). She went to a CC and then bridged to get her bachelors and it has worked out great for her. The hospital she works at actually prefers to hire the CC graduates because they receive better training than the BS graduates in the area. I have a bachelors degree in another field, but I still plan to bridge to BSN in the future. My advice is go to whatever school is easiest and fastest for you to get into. It does not matter what degree you get all that matters is whether or not you pass the NCLEX.
  8. 0
    Quote from valerie87
    How do you know that the pay is not that different? Do you or anyone you personally know have a BSN? And is it based on starting pay versus overall? I just know that employeers pay more in general when you have obtained a bachlor's of some sort. I would assume that this wouldn't be any different?
    Well...unlike a lot of people on this part of allnurses I'm an RN. I have personally worked at several hospitals in the Valley. Banner pays no difference. Where I am now pays .50 per hour more. If you get your Masters you get another $1.00. VA also pays about $1.00 more per hour. So the difference is minimal. If you want to get into administration, an advanced degree is more important. As far as who I personally know - I work with all sorts of nurses, majority of whom have a BSN.
  9. 0
    Quote from Stopnik
    The BSN pay differential is minimal at the few hospitals that even offer one. Most hospitals have onsite bridge programs - ADN to BSN - where you can get done in 14 months. ASU may be constructing a new building, but they are cutting done on the number of nursing slots in the short-term due to financial reasons (they lose money on nursing students). So a new building has nothing to do with how many slots are available for students.

    I would personally get my name in as many programs as possible (ADN, BSN, etc.).
    Hi, stopnik

    can you tell me more about onsite bridge program?

    my situation is... I will be done with my pre- and co-reqs for RN in 3 month. Im just accepted into M. Skill Center, starting in 2 months. after that Im trying to get into Block 3 at SCC or MCC. while Im in these schools, I will take some pre-req for ASU (like patho, nutrition, statistics, etc).

    what are the classes like at onsite? isn't it worth taking classes for ASU then? and what hospital offer that program? 14 month includes pre-reqs?

    thank you for taking your time.
    BTW, happy thanksgiving to everyone!
  10. 0
    Quote from Stopnik
    Well...unlike a lot of people on this part of allnurses I'm an RN. I have personally worked at several hospitals in the Valley. Banner pays no difference. Where I am now pays .50 per hour more. If you get your Masters you get another $1.00. VA also pays about $1.00 more per hour. So the difference is minimal. If you want to get into administration, an advanced degree is more important. As far as who I personally know - I work with all sorts of nurses, majority of whom have a BSN.
    So bascially you are basing this on just Arizona hospitals? I was thinking a more wider range than just working in hospitals.
  11. 1
    Quote from litaphoenix
    Hi, stopnik

    can you tell me more about onsite bridge program?

    my situation is... I will be done with my pre- and co-reqs for RN in 3 month. Im just accepted into M. Skill Center, starting in 2 months. after that Im trying to get into Block 3 at SCC or MCC. while Im in these schools, I will take some pre-req for ASU (like patho, nutrition, statistics, etc).

    what are the classes like at onsite? isn't it worth taking classes for ASU then? and what hospital offer that program? 14 month includes pre-reqs?

    thank you for taking your time.
    BTW, happy thanksgiving to everyone!
    Wow...I have a hard time figuring out major hospitals in the Valley (Banner, Scottsdale, Mayo, even Abrazo) that don't offer an onsite program. Generally, they entail classes held once a week - unit managers will often work with you to ensure you do not work those days. Lots of papers and group assignments. And then you are done in 14-months. A hassle while doing them - but worth it in the end if the BSN is important. Relax on the pre-reqs. I know for a fact that Grand Canyon does not require the ASU pre-reqs (pretty sure University of Phoenix is the same). So unless you have your heart set on ASU - you may not even need the nutrition, etc. You will need pathophysiology, though, for an MSN at Grand Canyon (once talked to their recruiter in-depth. Even with the downturn, hospitals are still very much into educating their nurses with these programs...
    litaphoenix likes this.


Nursing Jobs in every specialty and state. Visit today and Create Job Alerts, Manage Your Resume, and Apply for Jobs.

A Big Thank You To Our Sponsors
Top