Question on office injections?

  1. 0
    I am a patient receiving allergy injections at a local family practice clinic. (my allergist office is in another town, so I have my syrum sent to the family practice clinic)
    Just recently the family practice clinic hired my old high school nurse who has been in nursing for at least 40 yrs. When she gives my allergy shots, she gives then in my deltoid muscle instead of pinching up my skin & giving them in my subcutaneous tissue in the back of the upper arms like most of the others nurses do. My question is, how do I ask her to give my shots correctly & more comfortably with out offending her or starting an argument? She's very old school and probably wouldn't appreciate a nursing student telling her differently.







    edited to add more info
    Last edit by S.N. Visit on Jun 13, '05
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  4. 0
    I've always been given mine in the deltoid...

    Do you have the package insert to check up on this?
  5. 0
    Thanks for answering Trent.
    No I haven't access to the inserts, but I have my origional packet of info from my allergist. It states:

    Immunotherapy
    How is it done?

    * Small diabetic insulin syringes are used to inject commercial allergen extracts.
    * Injections are normally given into the loose ("floppy") tissue over the back of the upper arm, half way between the shoulder and elbow.
    * Injections are given under the skin ("subcutaneous").
    * This is the least painful place to inject allergen, as there are few nerve endings in the skin.
    * When given correctly, the injections should be slightly uncomfortable.
    * They are not normally painful and are usually well tolerated by adults and teenagers.
    * Some doctors may advise you to take an antihistamine a few hours before each injection to reduce the likelihood of local discomfort and other side-effects.
    Last edit by S.N. Visit on Jun 13, '05
  6. 0
    Quote from Tanzanite
    Thanks for answering Trent.
    No I haven't access to the inserts, but I have my origional packet of info from my allergist. It states:

    Immunotherapy
    How is it done?

    * Small diabetic insulin syringes are used to inject commercial allergen extracts.
    * Injections are normally given into the loose ("floppy") tissue over the back of the upper arm, half way between the shoulder and elbow.
    * Injections are given under the skin ("subcutaneous").
    * This is the least painful place to inject allergen, as there are few nerve endings in the skin.
    * When given correctly, the injections should be slightly uncomfortable.
    * They are not normally painful and are usually well tolerated by adults and teenagers.
    * Some doctors may advise you to take an antihistamine a few hours before each injection to reduce the likelihood of local discomfort and other side-effects.
    there is NO question-you should be given you injections sub-q and NOT in the deltoid......just say "hey I was wondering if you would please give it here: (and then show her!) I'd really appreciate it!"
  7. 0
    Thanks Nursescar, I'll do that, hopefully she'll agree
  8. 0
    Definately. Ask her to give it sub -q.
  9. 0
    Talk to the physician (the FP) if the nurse doesnt change her ways. There is a reason that allergy immunotherapy is given SQ -- and its an important one. The chances of having an anaphalytic shock are higher in a IM injection.
  10. 0
    Quote from Tanzanite
    I am a patient receiving allergy injections at a local family practice clinic. (my allergist office is in another town, so I have my syrum sent to the family practice clinic)
    Just recently the family practice clinic hired my old high school nurse who has been in nursing for at least 40 yrs. When she gives my allergy shots, she gives then in my deltoid muscle instead of pinching up my skin & giving them in my subcutaneous tissue in the back of the upper arms like most of the others nurses do. My question is, how do I ask her to give my shots correctly & more comfortably with out offending her or starting an argument? She's very old school and probably wouldn't appreciate a nursing student telling her differently.







    edited to add more info

    Hi Tanzanite-

    I work in a pediatric office where we frequently give allergy injections as well as being an allergy patient receiving IT myself. IT injections definitely need to be sub-q, not only because of the higher risk of reaction as noted earlier, but they also hurt more when in the deltoid (I've learned from personal experience! )

    Best of luck!


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