Medical Assistants in the office - page 16

This is probably going to open a can of worms.............but how do you all feel about replacing nurses in the office setting with Medical Assistants? How (if at all) do you feel it affects patient... Read More

  1. by   am27
    Your "logic" is not logical, so I will disregard your whole entry.

    Quote from ixchel
    Being told to do something by a person of higher licensure does not mean that that makes it within their scope of practice. You said you're a nurse at one point, right? If an MD instructs you to perform surgery, does that make it okay? If I, as an RN, can not tell one of my techs they are allowed to go give my patients their insulin, why in the world would an MA be allowed to do something outside their scope because someone told them they could?
  2. by   am27
    The MA doesn't need to know anything further than what is being relayed by the provider. If the patient has further questions, the MA documents the patient's concerns then directs a message back to the provider or even the clinic RN if there is one. This is nothing more than a middleman or means of relaying messages without interrupting clinic flow and without the higher cost of a nurse to simply relay messages (assuming that's all, except for the instance I mentioned in this paragraph). Idk what is so difficult to understand about the role of a clinic medical assistant when it pertains to messaging and relaying lab results or other advice PER THE PROVIDER.....

    The reasons that you people continue to argue ineffectively are clearly why medical assistants are increasing in clinics as nurses are decreasing. You really need to chill out. Ask any clinic manager about the duties of a medical assistant and they will tell you exactly what I have. They DO NOT go in depth about interpretation of lab results, implications, roles of other body systems and their implications on said problems. THEY RELAY WHAT THE PROVIDER HAS TYPED TO THE PATIENT AND THAT IS ALL. I can't speak for anyone of any job title stepping outside of their scope, but this is simple to understand, idk why you all are trying so hard to defend something unnecessary...

    Quote from ixchel
    Also, in the example of the MA telling a patient they have pre-diabetes, does the MA know the patient's meds? Does the MA know if there is impaired pancreatic function? Is the MA licensed to know why that matters??? No! An MA should not be telling a patient they are pre-diabetic. Heck, a nurse should be reserved in that conversation, too, depending on the history of the patient.
    Last edit by am27 on Sep 5, '15
  3. by   am27
    so so sorry for you all that get so upset by "zealous MA defenders" haha. Get some lives.
    Quote from Jensmom7
    Find your happy place...breathe...

    This is why I decided to just scroll past most of the convoluted logic and suspect "science" (like, when I start wheezing, I should just drink a big glass of OJ instead of reaching for my rescue inhaler? Nah, don't think so).

    You can't convince zealots that they're pulling "facts" out of their butts.

    ETA: and this is why I shouldn't try and post when hubby is yammering in my ear because I'm not paying enough attention to him.

    Thought this was the anti-vac zealots, as opposed to the MA zealots.

    Oh well, the same basic advice still applies lol.
  4. by   OrganizedChaos
    Quote from am27
    The MA doesn't need to know anything further than what is being relayed by the provider. If the patient has further questions, the MA documents the patient's concerns then directs a message back to the provider or even the clinic RN if there is one. This is nothing more than a middleman or means of relaying messages without interrupting clinic flow and without the higher cost of a nurse to simply relay messages (assuming that's all, except for the instance I mentioned in this paragraph). Idk what is so difficult to understand about the role of a clinic medical assistant when it pertains to messaging and relaying lab results or other advice PER THE PROVIDER.....
    Let's not yell.
  5. by   am27
    Maybe it's time this thread is closed. Posters keep commenting and arguing the clearly defined job duties of a certain healthcare professional and their personal beliefs are creeping in the discussions again. I can 100% back up everything I've posted (facts about job duties of a medical assistant, at least in my state) and the same cannot be said about the other posters speculating about medical assistants "maybe" providing advice that did not come straight from the provider. Please take this into consideration! Thank you!

    Quote from dianah
    Members, please note:

    Several posts have been deleted for off-topic remarks.

    Please post to the subject of the thread only, and refrain from name-calling, mud-slinging and/or personal attacks.
    Post only what you would say in front of a group of professionals.

    Thank you.
  6. by   am27
    Let's go tell our children what to do rather than attempt to belittle another adult ๐Ÿ˜Š
    Quote from OrganizedChaos
    Let's not yell.
  7. by   Jensmom7
    Quote from am27
    so so sorry for you all that get so upset by "zealous MA defenders" haha. Get some lives.
    Have a life, thank you, and much of it was spent informing MAs in physician offices that they are NOT RNs, they CANNOT speak on the physician's behalf, and if he's too cheap to employ an RN, then they WILL need to let him know that I need to talk to him.
  8. by   am27
    Yikes. You sound like such a pleasant Polly! Most clinics are not privately-run these days therefore a physician does not have much say about staff. Perhaps a more effective route would have been talking to the clinic supervisor or manager. Any workplace dislikes dealing with someone obviously on a power trip. Prayers to you and whomever encounters you whether professionally or not ๐Ÿ˜Š๐Ÿ˜Š

    Quote from Jensmom7
    Have a life, thank you, and much of it was spent informing MAs in physician offices that they are NOT RNs, they CANNOT speak on the physician's behalf, and if he's too cheap to employ an RN, then they WILL need to let him know that I need to talk to him.
  9. by   am27
    I'm just repeating myself AGAIN: nobody is saying that medical assistants speak on anyone's behalf. They are relaying messages that are already typed/dictated and electronically transcribed. Nothing is interpreted in any way by a medical assistant. Idk what is so hard to comprehend. You annoy staff by demanding to talk to a nurse if it isn't necessary in the case of RELAYING INFORMATION. I don't even care if I get flagged for this post, but DUHHHHHHHHHH people!!!!!!!!
  10. by   Jensmom7
    Quote from am27
    Yikes. You sound like such a pleasant Polly! Most clinics are not privately-run these days therefore a physician does not have much say about staff. Perhaps a more effective route would have been talking to the clinic supervisor or manager. Any workplace dislikes dealing with someone obviously on a power trip. Prayers to you and whomever encounters you whether professionally or not ๐Ÿ˜Š๐Ÿ˜Š
    No, I'm a professional who never appreciated non-nurses passing themselves off as RNs. When they identified themselves as MAs, the conversations proceeded without issues, and some of them were actually very helpful.

    Also, don't know where you're from, but around here there are quite a few private practices.

    Thankfully, in Hospice, don't really run into that problem very often, as most of the attendings have given me their cell numbers, for the rare times I need to discuss symptom management.

    And please don't waste your time praying over me. I'm secure in my belief system, and I'm sure your time would be better spent asking God for assistance in developing some maturity and loosening that chip from your shoulder.
  11. by   nursel56
    Quote from am27
    Medical assistants are responsible for "clinical messaging" aka relaying messages back and forth between provider and patient!!! That's all! There's nothing more to it so why make mountains out of molehills?! Let it go, geez!
    If the doctor told the MA to tell the patient her third elevated blood glucose indicated she had pre-diabetes that would be different from the MA coming up with that on her own.

    My experience is that when abnormal results of any kind are relayed by someone the doctor has authorized to divulge, the patient in many cases freaks out and asks a lot of questions the provider needs to answer.

    If it's someone who has a chronic problem and are thoroughly familiar with the drill, they may appreciate the information and the "heads-up" sooner than they would waiting for the provider to call them back.

    The "telephone triage" or anything approaching assessment (which would include speculating about what results might mean) is prohibited most of the time, but I haven't checked all 50 states and territories.

    The tone of your responses most likely is a reverberation of your first post here, in which you came in with "guns blazing" as they say.

    You personalized what you were reading about MAs and really overstated the amount of hostility most of us feel toward MAs. Many Advanced Practice Nurses work with MAs every day and rightfully sing their praises. It's really the person, not the title.
  12. by   icuRNmaggie
    So glad you understand the distinction. Nursing is a profession that requires extensive education and legal qualification.

    Medical office assisting is a vocation that may or may not require any vocational training and no legal qualification.

    A medical office assistant who claims to triage, assess , or provide patient education is practicing nursing without a license and that is board reportable.
    Last edit by icuRNmaggie on Sep 6, '15
  13. by   ixchel
    That facepalm may have left a bruise.

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