Medical Assistants in the office - page 14

This is probably going to open a can of worms.............but how do you all feel about replacing nurses in the office setting with Medical Assistants? How (if at all) do you feel it affects patient... Read More

  1. by   nursel56
    Quote from am27
    Medical assistants don't lack a scope of practice.
    What is the scope of practice of a medical assistant? In some states medical assistants have a clearly stated scope of practice, but in some states there is no law on the matter.

    Source: Understanding Medical Assistant Practice Liability Issues Medscape

    If you care to look into it further, you'll find that there is a huge variability from one state to the next on the subject of all unlicensed assistive personnel, and there is not a standardized test that all Medical Assistants would take that is comparable to the NCLEX-RN and NCLEX-PN for nurses.
    Last edit by nursel56 on Aug 31, '15
  2. by   enuf_already
    Quote from nursel56
    What is the scope of practice of a medical assistant? In some states medical assistants have a clearly stated scope of practice, but in some states there is no law on the matter.

    Source: Understanding Medical Assistant Practice Liability Issues Medscape

    I thought you would have done your own research before you declare other people are incorrect, but there you are. Medical Assistants are not regulated in all states the same way nurses are with the NCLEX.
    The NCLEX doesn't regulate anything. It's a test but I think your point was that MAs don't have to take a specific standardized test to be an MA. There are a few certification tests where I am but there's even confusion on which MA qualifies to take which test.

    Each state has a board of nursing who sets the rules and regulations and scope of practice for nurses (and sometimes MAs and CNAs) in their state.

    In my state, an MA pushing conscious sedation would get a clinic shut down. MAs in my state are not allowed to provide patient education. They can reinforce the education a provider has already reviewed with the patient but cannot initiate teaching on their own, even if a provider tells them to.
    Last edit by enuf_already on Aug 31, '15
  3. by   nursel56
    Quote from enuf_already
    The NCLEX doesn't regulate anything. It's a test but I think your point was that MAs don't have to take a specific standardized test to be an MA.
    Yes, that's exactly what I meant-- thanks! I'll fix it.
  4. by   am27
    Quote from enuf_already
    The NCLEX doesn't regulate anything. It's a test but I think your point was that MAs don't have to take a specific standardized test to be an MA. There are a few certification tests where I am but there's even confusion on which MA qualifies to take which test.

    Each state has a board of nursing who sets the rules and regulations and scope of practice for nurses (and sometimes MAs and CNAs) in their state.

    In my state, an MA pushing conscious sedation would get a clinic shut down. MAs in my state are not allowed to provide patient education. They can reinforce the education a provider has already reviewed with the patient but cannot initiate teaching on their own, even if a provider tells them to.
    MAs can be trained on the job for anything within reason. Which makes sense with all of the various specialties and increasing amount of in clinic procedures. And I can't even think of a scenario I was ever in that I initiated or even was in the situation to initiate teaching. The way you phrased it (reinforce what provider has gone over) is exactly how I would describe it.
  5. by   Jensmom7
    Quote from am27
    MAs can be trained on the job for anything within reason. Which makes sense with all of the various specialties and increasing amount of in clinic procedures. And I can't even think of a scenario I was ever in that I initiated or even was in the situation to initiate teaching. The way you phrased it (reinforce what provider has gone over) is exactly how I would describe it.
    Define "within reason".
  6. by   pixiestudent2
    Nothing against MAs.... But holy god! I would never in a million years, let one do sedation on me.
    That is scary, I wonder if their patients know what's going on....
  7. by   lindarn
    Of course, patients don't know what is going on.
    That is why doctors refer to them as, "nurses", and no one is the wiser.

    Lindarn, RN, BSN CCRN, (RET)
    SOMEWHERE IN THE PACNW)
  8. by   OrganizedChaos
    Quote from lindarn
    Of course, patients don't know what is going on.
    That is why doctors refer to them as, "nurses", and no one is the wiser.

    Lindarn, RN, BSN CCRN, (RET)
    SOMEWHERE IN THE PACNW)
    *shake my head* I guess sometimes ignorance is bliss.
  9. by   ixchel
    This thread is from 2002.
  10. by   pfchang
    I don't understand why this thread has continued on the way it has. I don't understand why am27 appears to be so persistently antagonistic and provocative. You said much earlier that you have seen MAs run circles around RNs in so many areas. Ok, whatever. What's your point now?
  11. by   pfchang
    It's one thing to debate and discuss different opinions. It's another thing to keep arguing about something on a public forum. I wish someone would remove this thread.
  12. by   BuckyBadgerRN
    I'll bet not. I'd be willing to bet that they are under the incorrect assumption that the person on the end of that plunger is an RN

    Quote from pixiestudent2
    Nothing against MAs.... But holy god! I would never in a million years, let one do sedation on me.
    That is scary, I wonder if their patients know what's going on....
  13. by   SleeepyRN
    Quote from HISSYTHECAT
    I am currently a CMA. The doctor offices that I have worked at...I was not referred to as a nurse.

    My job duties were to screen patient for the medical hx, check weight, set the room up, assist the dr, call in rx, send lab specimens off, schedule outpt px, call pts for test results, give injections, phlebotomy, check bp, EKGs, (know how to do IVs and Caths but never done them on anybody other than a dummy)and stock supplies.

    I have even worked in OR a couple of times assisting and I truly loved that. The only thing I could not do that a LPN or RN could not do was ?. I did not want to be referred as a nurse because I felt that I was not licensed. I am also cross trained for the front office as well. I am not putting anybody down, but that is the reason I am trying to go into RN. I want to be somebody with respect. As a CMA I feel like I am nobody but I can do all of the above. Does this make sense?
    My general observation has been that MAs, CNAs and techs are task oriented, while nurses utilize a critical thinking process to provide care.

    When asked what my job as a nurse is, I don't list tasks, as this writer did above. "My job duties..."
    Nurses understand this. I don't have the energy to explain it to UAP. All I can say is, when you become a nurse, then you will understand.

    To this day it still irks me that my ex-boyfriend said his SIL was a nurse. When I learned she was an office MA, he said, "well, she does everything a nurse does."
    Assess. Diagnose. Plan. Implement. Evaluate. This is the heart of what nursing is. Not a list of tasks.

    Recently at my doctor's office, an MA began telling me her frustrations of having the knowledge and education of a nurse, but not the title nor the pay. She's on a search for a nursing program that accepts her MA classes as transfer classes. She "refuses" to attend a program in which she has already "learned everything they teach."

    I think the fight in trying to get society to understand a nurse's role is futile. At least that's what I'm learning.

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