MA's being used as "nurses" - page 8

Hello all! I work in a private practice office in which I am the only RN. There are several MA's and one LPN. My concern is that the MA's are referred to as "nurses". The patients often do not... Read More

  1. by   smk1
    Quote from ms_orion
    What do you think of receptionist taking hts and wts on pts? Also, reviewing pt medical record for refills and lab orders? She is not writing the lab orders or refilling the prescriptions..."just gathering info for the nurse..."! I am so steamed!!
    Is this in her job description? Because if not, I would think that this is a HIPAA violation. Health info is supposed to be shared on a "need to know" basis even with co-workers. Also, unless she is physically handing the data from the lab over to the nurse, what possible benefit is it for the receptionist to review lab orders for which she probably has no idea of the meaning of the values? You also can't just take her word for it that her _________ test value was _____. Or she needs a refill of _______. Those things have to be checked for accuracy.
  2. by   HeartsOpenWide
    Quote from ms_orion
    What do you think of receptionist taking hts and wts on pts? Also, reviewing pt medical record for refills and lab orders? She is not writing the lab orders or refilling the prescriptions..."just gathering info for the nurse..."! I am so steamed!!
    I resent this comment. A ten year old can take an accurate weight and height. I work with a "receptionist" who has taken medical terminology, dispatcher courses and other addition courses. It is not likely that these front desk personnel are "OKing" the refills. They way it works in my office is that the refill request comes off the fax. It is paper clipped to the chart, the doctor or FNP reviews it and okay it or not. The MA or receptionist for that mater, simply has to look on the med sheet, find the corresponding approved refill, write the date in the box, quantity of pills, number of refills and the practitioners initials. It does not take a rocket scientist to look on a fax that says "Glucophage 500mg, #30 with 3 refills" and fill in the blanks on the med sheet and then fax it back to the pharmacy. Its not even hard to call the pharmacy and read off the approved refill "Glucophage 500mg, 1 BID #30 DNS, with 3 refills under Dr X"
  3. by   txspadequeenRN
    i agree


    Quote from smk1
    is this in her job description? because if not, i would think that this is a hipaa violation. health info is supposed to be shared on a "need to know" basis even with co-workers. also, unless she is physically handing the data from the lab over to the nurse, what possible benefit is it for the receptionist to review lab orders for which she probably has no idea of the meaning of the values? you also can't just take her word for it that her _________ test value was _____. or she needs a refill of _______. those things have to be checked for accuracy.
  4. by   txspadequeenRN
    i hope your joking!!!!



    Quote from heartsopenwide
    a ten year old can take an accurate weight and height. "
  5. by   ms_orion
    ? I dont see the "joke" ?
  6. by   Orion50
    As a lawyer I can definitely find cause to lay a claim that a receptionist is practicing medicine without a license. Yes that is my speciality. I love doctors, especially offices with poor management. They make my job easy!!!!!!!!
  7. by   HeartsOpenWide
    Quote from txspadequeen921
    i hope your joking!!!!
    i am being sarcastic...shame on me...it is too hard to show it through a post..,sorry
  8. by   HeartsOpenWide
    Quote from Orion50
    As a lawyer I can definitely find cause to lay a claim that a receptionist is practicing medicine without a license. Yes that is my speciality. I love doctors, especially offices with poor management. They make my job easy!!!!!!!!
    taking ht and wt and doing refills per doctor's order is not practicing medicine
  9. by   Orion50
    Yes, anyone can copy something they see in front of them. Monkey see, monkey do. The trick is that a receptionist and an MA for that matter do not understand the rationale behind what they are doing and probably won't spot an error. That is what makes nurses valuable. They have the training. Harder to win a court case when a nurse is involved and she is PAYING ATTENTION (or he). Doctors who relie heavily on MA's and receptionist run the risk of meeting me.
  10. by   Orion50
    Doing refills and putting someones else's initials IS!
  11. by   Orion50
    What clinic do you work for? I can prove my point!
  12. by   Orion50
    Sorry, I am being too aggressive. My point is this. A nurse has a license for a reason. A good nurse can and usually will spot "errors". Receptionists don't get that training when they learn to answer a phone. An Ma doesn't either. They are outside the scope of their training. That puts a doctor at risk! You nurses are worth your weight in gold. Some doctors, practices and hospitals just don't realize it. I try to help.
  13. by   ladybiker711
    My two cents. I am an LPN working 15 years in various Dr's offices.
    There has been a number of occasions when I have caught mistakes regarding dosages, allergies, ect the Dr has made BEFORE an Rx was faxed or called in. Will a street person be able to catch those mistakes or will they parrot what they've been told with no thoughts to it being wrong.

    I am frustrated that most of the 'nurses' who work in our office now are trained right off the street. Have no knowledge of physiology, even the basics of diabetes or COPD, but yet because they can stick someone with a needle, that makes them somehow competent. It matters not that they haven't a clue what the medication they are injecting is, or what they should look for as an adverse reaction, or what allergies might be in the same family. Its most frustrating.

    I too have heard them refer to themselves as a 'nurse'. At this point I am very frustrated with the medical field in general. I sometimes wonder why I went to school....I have discovered that one of the cracker-jack nurses is making more money than I am.

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MA's being used as "nurses"