Is Phys. Office nursing "Really Nursing"? - page 2

I am going through school with a friend, (we are taking our pre-req's together), and I happened to mention that I was interested in working in a Physicians office. To which she said, " I don't... Read More

  1. by   ana115
    Ok, so what is your opinion as to where a person should get experience before working in an office? Or do you think it would be a good idea to just go work there after graduation?

    I don't want to get caught up in a situation where there is tremendous understaffing right after I get out of school, become overwhelmed and burned out.

    Any suggestions?

    Thanks!
  2. by   Going80INA55
    One of the woman that I went to school with KNEW she did not want to do bedside care, so she never did. She graduated and went right into office nursing and to this day is still there and loves it.
    I will give you an idea of her work week.

    On Monday: she does nurse visits all day long. These are folks that are scheduled by her or the office to see her. This could be for education, shots, follow up to check wounds, dressing changes, foley changes etc. Just about anything.

    On Tuesday: She has a split day. She does outbound calling to folks who are home bound to check on them. She will also schedule visits if they need it. The other half is a paper day to get caught up.

    On Wednesday: She is on the floor, showing patients to rooms, assist md etc.

    On Thursday: She is in the field doing home visits to expectant mothers, and other patients who cant make it to the office. (she works with a poor population)

    On Friday: She does Phone triage.

    She works one saturday and one wednesday night a month, both in the walk-in triage area. (it is kind of like a mini er)

    So In reference to whoever stated that she should do med/surg so she could use what she was taught. I kind of think she would be.

    I say go for it and do the office nursing. They will be lucky and thrilled to have you. There is nothing like having someone come in to work with you that really wants to be there. They will all over themselves trying to teach you.
  3. by   ana115
    Thanks so much for the reply!

    I feel better now.

  4. by   SoonToBeNurse
    IMHO everyone has at least one aspect of nursing that they excell in...If you are happy in a Doctors Office, then that is where you should be!
    I am a fairly new nurse, but I knew that I wanted to work in a Doctors office after I did my clinical rotation in one. I did work in a hospital where I had an EVIL charge B**** who had the nerve to call me STUPID! simply because I did not agree with her opinion of a situation (that is another story) by the way...I graduated Valedictorian of my class! I was getting physically ill before EVERY shift and HATED going to work, even though I really LOVE nursing...So when the opportunity dropped in my lap to work with a Doctor that I have known all of my life, I jumped at the chance!
    I am now happier that I have ever been with ANY previous job! I actually look forward to going to work!
    I consider my job to be "real nursing" and for now anyway...I do not miss hospital nursing!
  5. by   LauraF, RN
    I worked in a pediatrician's office for 12 years. I loved it. But, you also need to find a doc that you work well with. The two pediatricians I worked for were awsome. They also gave me alot of responsibility. I did telephone triage, decided who needs to come in and who can try and handle it at home. I went through labs and pulled out the ones that the doctor really needed to review and make recommendations or prescribe for. I have injections, monitored weights. Plus a gained a great repor with the families. I loved watching the babies grow up to be older children. I also floated to an OB office when my pediatrician was out. NEVER did I work in a hospital. Currently I work PRN at a LTC because I'm in school and have very young children. I would recommend office nursing to a nurse who is very personable and who wants a long-term commitment.
  6. by   J Lynn
    I love working in an office in which I went straight out of school. I have to say that I often wondered if I was worthy enough to be called a nurse. I pretty much lost all my bedside skills I learned in school. So when I say that I'm a nurse, I always hesitate for a second. I have great respect for those nurses who work in hospitals, HH, and LTC. My job is so easy, anyone off the street with no experiance could probably do it. But, I remind myself of how hard I worked during school and I deserve my title.
  7. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    To which she said, " I don't really consider that nursing".
    To which i would have said "I really don't consider your opinion a big influence of my possible career choice."
  8. by   -Midget-
    Good response, Marie.
  9. by   Nurse Ratched
    Office nursing may not be adrenaline-y like the ER or have all sorts of tubes and wires sticking out of ppl like in ICU, and I certainly haven't had to wrestle anyone to the ground in the course of my clinic work (can't say that about psych!) BUT a good office nurse does his/her best to keep the patient out of the hospital. Someone's gotta do the daily grind of keeping people in refills and encouraging healthy behaviors that hopefully minimize the need for ER and inpatient visits. It is most certainly a worthy and worthwhile task .
  10. by   spiri1
    Does anyone know what the approximate pay scale is for office nursing ?

    I'm not a happy camper to work weekends and having only one day off
    between work days

    I've been thinking about working as an office nurse.

    My concern is the possiblility of a large pay cut.

    Any input would be appriciated.

    Terri
    Last edit by spiri1 on May 26, '06
  11. by   J Lynn
    LPN's make anywhere from $7 to $12 to start with no experience in an office. It all depends on what the doctor is willing to pay. RN's...I'm not sure. The doctors around where I work don't hire RN's due to the high pay scale.
  12. by   stephiebob/lpn2rn
    I have done office nursing for 6 yrs as a LPN & now as a RN. It is different from hospital nursing, you use different skills. In a hosp. you may have a patient for a 12hr shift & never see them again, in an office you have them as long as they continue to visit that office which means they rely on you (& call you) for everything. There is a lot of phone work & triage. You absoutely have to be able to multitask. Finding a good doctor to work for is a must because they will learn to rely on you & your judgement. A NURSE IS A NURSE NO MATTER WHAT FIELD YOUR IN.
  13. by   J Lynn
    Quote from stephiebob/lpn2rn
    I have done office nursing for 6 yrs as a LPN & now as a RN. It is different from hospital nursing, you use different skills. In a hosp. you may have a patient for a 12hr shift & never see them again, in an office you have them as long as they continue to visit that office which means they rely on you (& call you) for everything. There is a lot of phone work & triage. You absoutely have to be able to multitask. Finding a good doctor to work for is a must because they will learn to rely on you & your judgement. A NURSE IS A NURSE NO MATTER WHAT FIELD YOUR IN.
    Very well put .

Must Read Topics


close