How much difference in pay

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    will a years experience make at Providence or Alaska Regional? The starting pay is $25.50 an hour for a new graduate, but would waiting a year and having a years experience really increase the hourly wage?
    Also, are there any RN's in Alaska that support there family on there wage? I will be the sole bread winner in my family and am curious how hard it would be to support a wife and son there.
  2. 5 Comments so far...

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    According to the Providence labor contract with the Alaska Nurses Association, the hourly rate for new grads in 2007 is $25.21. The rate for an RN with one year's experience is $26.16.. In May of 2008, those rates will increase to $26.35 and $27.34, respectively.
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    Quote from JMBM
    According to the Providence labor contract with the Alaska Nurses Association, the hourly rate for new grads in 2007 is $25.21. The rate for an RN with one year's experience is $26.16.. In May of 2008, those rates will increase to $26.35 and $27.34, respectively.

    I would hope a man could provide for a family of three on $26.16 an hour up there.
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    I lived in Anchorage, AK for 5 years. You need to consider the high cost of living in AK also. My former spouse was military so things were cheaper for us. It costs about 25% more living up there due to high food costs, high utility costs, high clothing costs, etc. Basically anytime you buy something in AK you are paying extra for the shipping and that adds up over a year. Yes, you can get the PFD for being a resident, but that's not a whole lot in the big scheme of things of having to pay more to live there. Housing costs are high w/zero lot line homes in most of the area. There was a shortage of areas to build when I used to live there (I left in 2004) b/c they were running out of stable areas to build b/c it's situated in a valley and they have earthquakes, etc.

    If you have any questions I can try and help you. It's a beautiful place to live, but just want you to go into it w/your eyes open as it can get very expensive up there quickly. I saw a lot of people move up there b/c of the "free" money for being a resident. What they didn't know ahead of time was that the money varies dependent upon the oil prices and you have to live up there from Jan 1-Dec 31 (an entire year, no exceptions). I had to wait 2 years before I could get the PFD up there.

    My new husband and I would like to move back to AK some day as we both love the area. It does get cold and you don't feel much heat from the sun. Some people can't take that mentally, so be prepared for that. A heat wave is 72 up there. I remember getting goosebumps trying to sunbathe in AK!haha There is some beautiful places to visit up there, but you will have to get used to having 9 months of winter.

    Good luck!
    Michelle:spin:
    Ironclad and classicmusic09 like this.
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    Dear Michelleleh72, Thank you for your indepth, experience, of living in Alaska. I've heard about the money, and the beauty of the area! It was extremely helpful, to hear about the other aspects, regarding the high cost of living, the effects of the cold, and the time frame involved with receiving, the financial benefits. It's one of those dreams, you sort of put on a back burner, and consider. Have a Prosperous New Year! :spin:
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    Why don't you try travel nursing in Alaska. Your wife and son can join you for a great summer experience, you will get your housing paid for and you can find out if you like it without the committment. If you do like it - there are substantial sign on bonus's for those living and moving from out of state. Travellers are our number one recruitment strategy!


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