BSN vs. RN Salary - page 2

by busylizzy

194,407 Views | 67 Comments

Hi! I got a lot of information about RN salaries from another thread. What it seems to be, is that around the Bham area, starting salaries are at about $18/hr. My question is, to any of you that know, or any of you that are... Read More


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    Quote from readyforsuccess99
    Ummm, open up your FUNDAMENTALS BOOK... This was actually on our test..... A person who graduates with an "Associate's Degree" in Registered Nursing IS a REGISTERED NURSE. Guess what? A person who graduates with a "Bachelor's Degree" in Registered Nursing IS a REGISTERED NURSE. SO THEY ARE BOTH RN's. It's simply that the type of DEGREE is different in that if you want to pursue other areas: master's degree, teaching, PA, whatever, you must have your Bachelor's Degree to acquire that. There is typically no difference in pay, AND an Associate's Degree R.N. can be a charge nurse just like someone that holds a Bachelor's Degree. And as far as BSN's getting hired over ADN's, rumor. You both obtained the same skills and had to take the same boards...ugh that just made me mad.... this forum is to help one another, not bring others down. If an Associate's Degree is not "a real degree" why does every college all over the world SAY IT IS...okay, i'm off my soap box..
    Actually, the title RN refers to registered nurse. You do not graduate in registered nursing. You graduate either with a BSN, an ADN or with a diploma in nursing and then have to take your boards. Only once you successfully pass the NCLEX are you an RN.

    Except at the VA, all new grads are hired in hospitals at Staff I positions, regardless of degree and do the same work, therefore earn the same pay. It is when you want to go into management that the degree becomes more important. And charge nurse is not managment. Nursing manager or administration is. And most of those are going to require or at least prefer MSN prepared nurses. And you can go into an MSN, depending on the program, with either an ADN or BSN. The ADN to MSN will just usually take a little longer. If you want to go in community or HH, you need a BSN at this point. Yes, there are HH with 2yr, but they have experience and will be grandfathered in. New grads need BSNs for that.

    What hospitals hire is the best candidate for the job. Now if you have two people who have the same skill set, interview well and are a good fit, the BSN will usually get the job simply because it is a higher degree. But obviously if someone with an ADN is a better fit for the unit than the BSN, the ADN will get the job.

    However, the future of nursing is changing. Many nurse practioner programs are starting to change it from a masters level to a DNP level. And I have been told by nurse managers (who do the hiring) at 2 difference hospitals, that the shift has already started towards solely BSN trained staff, although again, existing ADNs will be grandfathered in.
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    Maybe you are thinking of a diploma nurse who graduates from a hospital program and not a college? That nurse would get an RN or an LVN but would not have a BSN OR ADN degree.

    Quote from sosiouxme
    An RN with only the "ADN" (which, by the way, is not considered a college degree) would make as much as someone with a BSN only if they hold the same position. However, most BSN's are hired at higher levels than the non-degreed RN's to begin with. With the ADN - you will almost never advance to the same level as someone with a BSN, or better, a Master's, can achieve.
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    it's not true that an ADN is not considered a college degree. the words "ASSOCIATE DEGREE OF NURSING". a RN nursing certificate is not considered a college degree
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    Quote from sosiouxme
    An RN with only the "ADN" (which, by the way, is not considered a college degree) would make as much as someone with a BSN only if they hold the same position. However, most BSN's are hired at higher levels than the non-degreed RN's to begin with. With the ADN - you will almost never advance to the same level as someone with a BSN, or better, a Master's, can achieve.


    Let me point out the many idiotic statements in this post.

    Fail #1 - the Asso Degree Nursing IS by the way, a COLLEGE degree. Mostly due to the fact it is issued by a COLLEGE. University by definition is an institution that offers graduate level courses. College can refer to a 2 OR a 4 year school, case in point smaller liberal arts colleges that do not have graduate programs.

    Fail #2 - Most BSN's are NOT hired at "higher levels" to begin with, because both the BSN and the ADN have the same amount of work experience off the bat (none). You would be hard pressed to find a credible hospital that would hire a CC or unit co-ordinator fresh off the boat just because they held an allmighty BSN.

    Fail #3 - "With the ADN - you will almost never advance to the same level as someone with a BSN, or better, a Master's, can achieve." Obvious statement is obvious. You mean to tell me that Nurse Practitioners have better pay and more responsibility than an RN? Thank you for enlightening all of us...
    josettern2012, FA2NS, and Jessy_RN like this.
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    Quote from sosiouxme
    An RN with only the "ADN" (which, by the way, is not considered a college degree) would make as much as someone with a BSN only if they hold the same position. However, most BSN's are hired at higher levels than the non-degreed RN's to begin with. With the ADN - you will almost never advance to the same level as someone with a BSN, or better, a Master's, can achieve.
    Two more years of literature and history courses don't make you a better nurse dearie. Drop the ego. We are here to support each other, not diss anyone who didn't want to pay twice as much for the same outcome.
    I am a PCT at UAB (and a pre-nursing student) and I have many friends who are nurses (both BSN and ADN). ALL agree there is no difference when you start out. A Staff RN is a Staff RN is a Staff RN! However, once you get in to clinical management and supervisory positions, some facilities do prefer a BSN over an ADN with equal experience (and some require MSN). I myself will be getting a BSN ONLY because I plan to continue my education from there. Although I am certainly being thrifty by getting my Associate of Science at a CC first.
    josettern2012, alblove, Dazglue, and 3 others like this.
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    I am aware of a hospital in Atlanta which only hires BSN or higher degreed nurses. There are so many nurses wanting to work there that they decided to weed out the applicants by hiring only BSNs. Many hospitals looking for Magnet status also prefer BSNs and also want the nurses to have specialty certification in their area of work. I imagine that if a nurse with and ADN wants to be a bedside nurse her entire career and work in a hospital which is not in a major city (which by the way is me) she/he would not need the BSN unless they want the knowledge (which by the way is me again... I hope to get my BSN one day just for s*&ts & giggles).

    I also believe that if nursing required more education than 2 years that the "world" would have a bit more respect for us. All knowledge is power in the end. I'm sure I've upset someone with my post so I apologize in advance.
    NightAngelle likes this.
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    Keep in mind that a 2 year RN is really a 3+ year degree considering the prereqs. Although I do firmly believe an RN should have the same college requirements as a bachelor's degree, which would mean adding on a few more prereqs than are currently required for a 2 yr RN. Getting my bachelor's in a completely different subject other than nursing, I feel that the classes I took helped me develop critical thinking and awareness skills necessary for nursing. It astounds me that you can be an RN regardless of whether you get an ADN/ASN or a BSN, as there is such a difference between the programs. Personally, I will be getting an ADN/ASN, as I already have my bachelor's and the only 2 BSN programs near me have requirements above and beyond what most BSN schools have: one is a Catholic university and would require me to take several semesters of religion classes. I have already taken several religion classes and taught in a Christian school so I don't find that necessary!!
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    Both degrees typically start out the same in my research. I am returning to school to become an RN. I will say that in my experience a 4 year institution might be easier to get into the nursing program. A lot of community colleges have limited space which make this harder to be accepted and more competitive. A BSN has an advantage if you want to continue education.
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    VA is the only employer that I know of that really pays you significantly more for a BSN or a Masters degree. I really think an RN should be required to have a BSN degree in the future. I think this is how the healthcare industry has been able to keep nursing pay so low. Physical Therapists and Occupational Therapists for example have to now have Master degrees. If RNs had to have at least a BSN, the job would be more respected and the salaries would go up. Please don't get me wrong, I am not trying to criticize anyone who has an Associates Degree and is an RN. They should be grandfathered into the system with no other requirements. I am saying going forward though it would do a lot for our profession and the pay and respect we receive.....Just my opinion.
    MandaRN94, boochica, and NightAngelle like this.
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    I personally attended a 4yr college and could not get into the BSN program due to a limited amount of space this has forced me to pursue ADN. I currently hold a BA in Sociology, I would have loved to recieve a BSN and go from there but I had no other choice due to spacing.


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