Have any of you done flu clinics????????

  1. Hi everyone, just wondering if you have done the flu clinics' thru your agencies. I talked to an agency today and they say that the pay is a little les but that the clinics are fun & easy. I asked who are they easy for the nurse or reciepiant of the flu shot?:chuckle :chuckle Anyway they said that a couple hundred people show up. how many nurses do they have giving flu shots???? They also said the paperwork is soooooo basic. Is it worth the little effort they promised, or am I better off scheaduling a little extra time at my day job to pick up some extra cash??? Love to hear any experiences you may have with this, thanks .
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  2. 8 Comments

  3. by   mattsmom81
    I've signed up to do flu clinics tha past 2 years only to have them canceled the last minute due to vaccine shortages.

    Many semi retired local nurses would come out to do these, as they are not difficult and the paperwork is basic. Only when someone has a bad reaction to the vaccine does it get difficult....then you have crowd control and angry people who've been waiting in line and aggravated because you're dealing with the emergency. Sometimes you're the only nurse at these clinics.

    It takes some people skills for sure...dealing with the crowds. My agency scheduled 3-4 hour clinics so to get a full day in we had to work 2...and if the am clinics ran late that could be a problem.

    Many semi retired nurses report they like doing this every year just for the community contact; as they don't want to work often and wish not/cannotdo the hard facility work. .

    Most nurses will prefer a facility or agency shift of 30- 40 bucks an hour, so its hard to justify a break to do flu clinics and make less than half that. But if one is on a pension/SS it is a nice 2 week job for extra pocket money every year!
  4. by   Hairstylingnurse
    Yes they are offering $13 an hr. for lpns and $14 an hour for rns because there is supposedly nothing to it. But you bring out some interesting points that I wasn't aware of, which is exactly what I needed here. Thanks
  5. by   mattsmom81
    You're welcome. VNA was who I went through, and they pay better...$20 hr for RN's, $16 for LPN's if they are in your area...but they've canceled the past 2 yrs too.

    The groups VNA administers too are not considered high risk.
  6. by   CrunchRN
    Mattsmom,

    I have never seen a reaction to the flu vaccine. Can you elaborate and educate me? I would like to have a clue about what to expect if that situation were to occur so that I could act appropriately. Thanks!
  7. by   Hairstylingnurse
    Hi again mattsmom, I hate to sound simple but what does vna stand for????? Did you have to go into the agency and watch videos on flu shot clinics? I already did all the test and paperwork just have to go in tomorrow and watch videos. I'm supposed to go in 10-2. I'm assuming that it is unpaid. I would like to check VNA out and possibly register with them. I'm trying to get a variety of things on my resume and at the same time trying to do several different things in nursing to see where my interests lie.:kiss P.S. I'm thinking that VNA is for visiting nurses association?????
    Last edit by Hairstylingnurse on Sep 15, '05
  8. by   HeartsOpenWide
    I do this every year at the office I work for. We ussually have a"clinic" time set up. Three different times and dates. One each for Medicare, Medi-Cal (like Medicaid) and Private pay (most insurances do not pay for flu shots)
    We charge $15. We have a booklet for each group of insurances. Each person has to print and sign their name. If they have Medicare or Medi-Cal they must include their ID #. Next to it I chart the site inj and manufac, and lot, exp.

    The clinics are generally "crazy" you stick-um and call the next one. I recommend getting the spot bandages, they are the easiest to deal with. Also, draw all your shots up before they come in.
    Many people worry that the Flu shot will make them sick. Some people have some side effects, but nothing like if they were to really get the flu. Others complain of a read tender area after the shot, but most have no side affects at all. Unless things have changed, the flu shots have chicken embros in them and should not be given to those that are allergic to eggs.
    Make sure you do not give your shots too early, you want it to last the whole flu season.

    I am suprised they are getting nurses to do this. Any one certified to give shots can do these, and get paid at a fraction of what they would have to pay a nurse.
  9. by   mattsmom81
    Quote from Hairstylingnurse
    Hi again mattsmom, I hate to sound simple but what does vna stand for????? Did you have to go into the agency and watch videos on flu shot clinics? I already did all the test and paperwork just have to go in tomorrow and watch videos. I'm supposed to go in 10-2. I'm assuming that it is unpaid. I would like to check VNA out and possibly register with them. I'm trying to get a variety of things on my resume and at the same time trying to do several different things in nursing to see where my interests lie.:kiss P.S. I'm thinking that VNA is for visiting nurses association?????

    Yup...Visiting Nurse Association...you got it! they do a half day orientation through VNA. They also give you the opportunity to work in other public health-type health fairs, etc if you want to. Check them out.
  10. by   mattsmom81
    Quote from CrunchRN
    Mattsmom,

    I have never seen a reaction to the flu vaccine. Can you elaborate and educate me? I would like to have a clue about what to expect if that situation were to occur so that I could act appropriately. Thanks!
    There's usually one or two every season, according to the veteran flu clinic nurses I oriented with. The most severe, of course, are anaphylactic. (sweating, dizziness/syncope, SOB, feeling of impending doom, hypotension, etc) We had a medpack with Epi and Benadryl injections should anaphylaxis occur...and a standing order from the medical director of VNA to cover us til EMS got there.. But then....some folks will just faint away and you have to watch them closely and take their BP to rule out anaphylaxis. Some folks are just needle phobic, and have keeled over before with needlesticks, so its a smart idea to always ask patients before ya stick 'em. ( so you know what to expect.)

    The less severe delayed reactions we referred to their individual docs. Occasionally a severe local reaction would occue...and we had a choice to give Benadryl, issue a warning to them and we would insist they followup with their PCP.

    We had a list/questionnaire (I forget the details now) to head off potential problems with the vaccine, and to guide is in decision making. I'm sure all agencies will have this, as well as strict policies and procedures to follow. One of our policies was: when in doubt, refuse them the vaccine and refer them back to their PCP.
    Last edit by mattsmom81 on Sep 15, '05

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