is uk nursing qualifications the same as the us qualifications? - page 2

by sissabell 8,523 Views | 22 Comments

hey i have been searching the internet about uk and us qualifications to see if they are the same but i havent found anything yet! i want to become a nurse and study my nursing degree in the uk but then after i get my degree i... Read More


  1. 1
    Quote from ZippyGBR
    i'd be interested to hear the rationale for that statement ...
    I'm not sure how many clinical hours are included in UK RN training now, but I think I'm correct to say both diplomas and degrees are 3 years full time.I did read that the time is divided equally between theory and practice, but of course some of that practice will be in the clinical labs. I don't think training in the UK is as good as it was in the 80s, when you still had to pass essay and MCQ examinations and had something like 3000 clinical hours.

    In the USA it's possible to train to be a RN in 2 yrs and gain an associates degree in nursing (ADN).
    Bearing in mind that ALL USA undergraduate degrees include college level English, Math and usually at least 2 other general subjects related to the major,2 YRS isn't adequate IMO
    I have a friend who is half way through her ADN and IMO her course is crazy. They seem to whizz through huge amounts of theoretical knowledge where they are expected to know( and are tested on) for eg all normal lab values, blood gasses etc etc in about 2 weeks. The associated clinical placement is 2 x 5 hr "shifts" per week. They covered all GI A/P and associated diseases in 2 weeks.

    Of course in order to pass NCLEX you have to know all this theory.

    Even some of the 4 YR BSNs have only 700 clinical hours.

    Maybe they aren't so concerned about clinical decision making in the US, as I gather that, unless you're a NP , you pretty much need a Drs written order for everything. Things that seem ridiculously like common sense to me eg if a venflon has been in situ for 3 days and not being used, pt is being discharged or it looks infected, then take it out and document it and inform the medical staff.Not rocket science!
    madeleine likes this.
  2. 0
    Quote from misswoosie
    I'm not sure how many clinical hours are included in UK RN training now, but I think I'm correct to say both diplomas and degrees are 3 years full time.I did read that the time is divided equally between theory and practice, but of course some of that practice will be in the clinical labs. I don't think training in the UK is as good as it was in the 80s, when you still had to pass essay and MCQ examinations and had something like 3000 clinical hours.
    2300 hours in clinical practice as a Student and no hours as a rostered contribution to Auxiliary provision ...

    I'm not sure that any suggestion of transferring skills lab hours from theory to practice has actually floated, and i'd argue that the problem with placement availability is an unwillingness of HEIs to look beyond traditional labels for certain placement areas - such as labelling tertiary units and CCU as 'critical care' and only using the areas for the short 'critical care ' placement

    The academic requirements are streets ahead with a proper validated Higher education qualification rather than the academic component being deemed to be 'equivalent' to Cert HE. you only need to compare the levels of understanding and knowledge around the subject of 'traditionally trained ' vs HEI prepared for practice Paramedics to quantify the leap that moving to Higher education makes in a profession, in nursing the waters were muddied because there was a creep into early post -reg HE prior to the move to HE for pre-reg

    The UK still maintains block placements with student working full shifts and expected to contribute to the RN workload in line with their seniority and agreed learning outcomes. Supernumerary Status is not an excuse to opt -out and it;s poor management by HEIs and 'failure to fail' by mentors that allows the myths about supernumerary status to persist.
  3. 0
    Hi,
    i was just wondering if anyone could clarify a few things for me. i am currently in a scottish nursing school studying general adult nursing and i was just wondering because we dont cover paediatrics, obstetrics and psychiatry which are areas you must have theory and practical experience in before you can even sit the NCLEX exam how do scottish registered nurses make it to america?? is there a conversion course??? how did you get around it??? i have a green card so dont need to worry about immigration thankfully.
  4. 2
    UK training is significantly different than US training, as UK nurses are trained in one of several specialties and US nurses are trained more broadly.

    Do not know if OP is a US citizen, but if they do not have working papers, with retrogression in place, it will be a long time in the queue to work stateside.

    And even longer to get a job in Hawaii. Given the current recession and that just about everyone and their brother wants to work and the incredible glut of unemployed nurses, it will difficult to get a job there.
    Fiona59 and GBRRN like this.
  5. 0
    Very fascinating. I didn't realize there was so much differences in training!
  6. 4
    LOL your post made me giggle for good reasons.

    I am presently a 2nd year student in the UK and have observed the above many times. But let me just say we are not all like that. I love looking after patients and doing basic care, I go home happy I have done a good days work and happy that I have helped the patient.

    Also there is nothing wrong with wanting to learn about what you are doing and why then you can put it into context and explain to your anxious patient. Lets be honest Drs. don't have good communication skills (or writing skills lol). They frighten and bamboozle patients with terminology. Nurses are excellent communicators who can explain that 'hypertension' isn't a cancerous growth but maybe an indication to eat better and exercise more lol. Nursing in the UK is great I have met some fantastic, educated and professional nurses tht have brought me to tears with their empathy and knowledge.

    Big up the NHS I am proud to be part of it and training to become a nurse.


    Kkestral
    Fiona59, baliling, K+MgSO4, and 1 other like this.
  7. 1
    2300 hours in clinical practice as a Student and no hours as a rostered contribution to Auxiliary provision


    Says it all really!
    So many nurses these days won't do/don't think they should do the bread and butter nursing stuff -that the healthcare assistants do nowadays because SENs are no longer and nurse training moved into academia.
    Much of auxillary provision IS good ,basic ,nursing care and it's also when assess and evaluate as well as comminicate with your patient, eg bedbathing, making beds,doing obs etc etc.
    We got to the stage of healthcare assistants doing obs because there was no one else to do them and most do not have the knowledge or training to be undertaking this level of responsibility and rely on automated devices to do them.

    Too much about "me" nowadays and not enough about "them" (the patients)
    Fiona59 likes this.
  8. 0
    2300 hours in clinical practice as a Student and no hours as a rostered contribution to Auxiliary provision

    BabyRN posted that she met the requirements for a UK RN license with only 800 clinical/700 theory hours.
    Why on earth would they do that?

    Does anyone know (out of interest) what the minimum hours are for a foreign nurse seeking to become a US RN?
  9. 0
    Do you need a degree to work in the states? i am an RN and only have my diploma
  10. 0
    The degree/diploma choice isn't the issue. Many of the old style RGNs were and still are eligible for ATT before the UK training was divided in this way.
    Its all about the total content of the training, and having sufficient hours in all four areas, adult, peds, psych and obstetrics.

    I never found the minimum total written anywhere, but I submitted my transcript and immediately got the ATT. I'm an RGN, (who happens to have since completed a degree, but I did not submit that for the ATT), and they deemed my training as acceptable.

    If your diploma is in adult nursing, then chances are you won't meet the minimum requirement for peds, psych and obstetrics.

    Hope that helps.


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