Register first as nurse or immigrate first

  1. Hi,
    I am interested in either moving to Canada or the US to work as a nurse. DO you think I should
    go first through the whole registration process to become registered as a nurse and then look for a job who sponsors my visa or should I rather immigrate first - for example try to get the PR in Canada first - and then once I have PR start the registration process?
    I am asking as it seems no point going through the whole registration process and in the end I get my nursing registration but then no job there as I am not a PR...
    whats your thoughts or experiences?
    cheers,
    Nati
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  2. Visit Natisu profile page

    About Natisu

    Joined: Nov '17; Posts: 7

    8 Comments

  3. by   dishes
    If you decide to immigrate to Canada do as many steps of the registration process as you can before moving. Most IENs face barriers to registration in Canada, they start by having their education assessed by NNAS which may take 8 months or longer and the results may show that the IENs education is somewhat comparable or not comparable to a Canadian BScN education. You can use the search tool in the top right hand corner to find other posters results from their nnas assessment, search for a thread entitled 'nnas experience'.
  4. by   Natisu
    Hi dishes,
    Thanks for your reply. I read now most of the nnas experience thread and am quite demotivated now about moving to Canada as a nurse.
    Did I understand it right.. I have to first apply to nnas (from what I read my degree will not be comparable with a CA degree in nursing) and then even though it's not comparable I can sit for the OCSE exam (or can they tell me that I have to do a bridging course straight away without even taking the OCSE exam???)... then if I fail the OCSE I need to do a full bridging course and if I pass the OCSE, I still might need to make up theory and practise hours somewhere before I am allowed to take the NCLEX exam?
  5. by   dishes
    I think it's more common for IENs to be offered the chance to do a competency assessment and it is less common for IENs to be directed to go straight into a bridging program. I think the assessment process is evolving as it goes, it makes it hard to predict what an IENs nnas results will be and how the provincial regulatory body will interpret those results. I think the process may be somewhat easier for applicants who apply after September 2016 than it was for applicants who applied before Sept 2016, so at least you will be applying at a better time, (if you decide to apply to Canada).
    Suggest you read the licensing and immigration requirements thoroughly and make a budget for all the potential costs such as; nnas application, having your school, employer and licensing body send documents, regulatory body application fees, competency assessment fees, bridging program tuition, nclex exam, jurisprudence exam, plus immigration fees including proof of funds to support yourself when you first move to Canada. The cities in Canada have more nurses than jobs, local qualified nurses are struggling to find work, Canadian employers have no need to recruit nurses from offshore.
    Last edit by dishes on Dec 8, '17
  6. by   Natisu
    From what you wrote, Canada has a lot of their own local nurses... so I guess the hospitals are unlikely to employ foreign nurses (even if I get registered in Canada) as they need a visa sponsorship ..
    Should I at the same time try to get PR in Canada so that I won't need to get a visa sponsorship by a hospital?
  7. by   dishes
    Quote from Natisu
    From what you wrote, Canada has a lot of their own local nurses... so I guess the hospitals are unlikely to employ foreign nurses (even if I get registered in Canada) as they need a visa sponsorship ..
    Should I at the same time try to get PR in Canada so that I won't need to get a visa sponsorship by a hospital?
    Yes your best option is to come as a PR as the employers in the cities have more than enough applicants for jobs, they cannot justify hiring a nurse who requires a visa. There may be some employers located in northern rural and remote communities that will hire a RN who is registered locally but requires a visa, but that may be too much of a culture shock for an IEN.
  8. by   Natisu
    Hi dishes,
    If I come as PR but am not yet registered as a nurse in Canada, Can I work in other nursing-related occupations like assistant nurse or working in the elderly home as carers without doing any Exams? (To have some income while I am preparing to get registered as a nurse)
  9. by   dishes
    @natisu, some employers may be willing to hire you as a health care aid, beware that the cost of living is usually too high to live off a care giver wage. It will be difficult to pay for rent, food, bills, transportation, etc on a minimum wage (or slightly higher) salary. It will also be difficult to save money for competency assessments, the nclex exam or tuition etc while living in Canada. There are published articles and media reports about IENs who came to Canada as live in caregivers with the hope of gaining PR then becoming RNs, however, many of them became deskilled and remained in caregiver jobs and never did complete the requirements to become RNs.
    Last edit by dishes on Dec 12, '17
  10. by   SpidersWeb
    Quote from Natisu
    Hi,
    I am interested in either moving to Canada or the US to work as a nurse. DO you think I should
    go first through the whole registration process to become registered as a nurse and then look for a job who sponsors my visa or should I rather immigrate first - for example try to get the PR in Canada first - and then once I have PR start the registration process?
    I am asking as it seems no point going through the whole registration process and in the end I get my nursing registration but then no job there as I am not a PR...
    whats your thoughts or experiences?
    cheers,
    Nati
    Based on your post it's not clear what other options you have for legal immigration. I'd say you should immigrate on an employment-based visa as an RN. Now that there's a growing shortage of nurses especially in the US, it's fairly easy to obtain a visa as a foreign-educated RN. This means you have to pass the NCLEX and all of these immigration requirements. There are some recruitment firms that will provide an NCLEX review program and sponsor you an EB-3 in exchange for an employment contract.

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