Green Card & Associate Degree - page 5

Hi, I've been looking at the US Immigration Laws & I was wondering.... Does anyone know if the INS allows associate degree nurses (trained in the US) to get an Immigrant Visa (Green Card) or is a... Read More

  1. by   jbearmn
    Thank you for your advice. Do you know exactly when USCIS chaged this regulation? Otherwsie, if you are true, I think I am going to sue my immgration attorney for malpractice.

    Many foregin nurses are coming from other countries such as Philippines to the US as nurses. They can get the special work visa and they are eligible for the green card....thay are treated SO WELL. And I am the one educated in nursing in the US, graduated from a Nursing School in the US, passed the NCLEX-PN and I am actually an LPN in the US.....I cannot get a job just because LPN is NOT qualified for H1-B!? Is it so funny???.....

    You said that 2 year RN is qualified for green card, right? How about H1-B? I guess I should look into the 2 year RN program....
  2. by   RN2Bin05
    Hey pinkpokey

    Quote from pinkpokey
    Hi there,
    What is OPT and would she qualify for this?.
    An OPT = Optional Practical Training. An OPT is essentially a one year work visa that any foreign student who graduates from at least a two year program in the U.S. automatically qualifies for. Your sister would not qualify if she planned to attend LPN school.


    Have your sister meet with an international student advisor at any community college or other nursing school for more info.

    I hope this helps!
  3. by   suzanne4
    Quote from jbearmn
    Thank you for your advice. Do you know exactly when USCIS chaged this regulation? Otherwsie, if you are true, I think I am going to sue my immgration attorney for malpractice.

    Many foregin nurses are coming from other countries such as Philippines to the US as nurses. They can get the special work visa and they are eligible for the green card....thay are treated SO WELL. And I am the one educated in nursing in the US, graduated from a Nursing School in the US, passed the NCLEX-PN and I am actually an LPN in the US.....I cannot get a job just because LPN is NOT qualified for H1-B!? Is it so funny???.....

    You said that 2 year RN is qualified for green card, right? How about H1-B? I guess I should look into the 2 year RN program....
    They are coming as RNs, that is the big difference. There are no H1-B visas currently available for nurses. Three years ago they were there, but no longer. But they were never good for the LPN license.

    With a two year RN in the US, you qualify for the green card, but not with the LPN. This is why I always tell everyone that they need to do some research on their own. Your attorney probably heard two year degree, and thought that ti was the same, but it is not. This has always been the practice, not anything new.
    Last edit by suzanne4 on Jul 26, '05
  4. by   suzanne4
    Quote from jbearmn
    Thank you for your advice. Do you know exactly when USCIS chaged this regulation? Otherwsie, if you are true, I think I am going to sue my immgration attorney for malpractice.

    Many foregin nurses are coming from other countries such as Philippines to the US as nurses. They can get the special work visa and they are eligible for the green card....thay are treated SO WELL. And I am the one educated in nursing in the US, graduated from a Nursing School in the US, passed the NCLEX-PN and I am actually an LPN in the US.....I cannot get a job just because LPN is NOT qualified for H1-B!? Is it so funny???.....

    You said that 2 year RN is qualified for green card, right? How about H1-B? I guess I should look into the 2 year RN program....
    There is no reason to do another two year program. If you have the LPN already, there are bridge programs available that can be done in less time and you should not have any problem getting into them.
  5. by   suzanne4
    Quote from RN2Bin05
    Hey pinkpokey



    An OPT = Optional Practical Training. An OPT is essentially a one year work visa that any foreign student who graduates from at least a two year program in the U.S. automatically qualifies for. Your sister would not qualify if she planned to attend LPN school.


    Have your sister meet with an international student advisor at any community college or other nursing school for more info.

    I hope this helps!
    An OPT is granted after completing an RN program to get additional training in that area for one year. It doesn't cover LPN programs.
  6. by   suzanne4
    Where are you currently located? There are also some very good bridge programs that are on-line that are available to you.
  7. by   RN2Bin05
    Quote from suzanne4
    An OPT is granted after completing an RN program to get additional training in that area for one year. It doesn't cover LPN programs.
    There must be an echo in here....
  8. by   suzanne4
    You didn't list that a "professional" degree was an actual requirement for the OPT.
  9. by   jbearmn
    Thank you guys! I already used my OPT when I graduated from a 4 year college. My LPN Nursing degree is lower than my education and I already used once. So, OPT is not the option for me.

    I'm living in Minneapolis. Actually, today, I went to couple community colleges to find out if I can take a Nursing Mobility Program. And I made an appointment with a new immigration attorney tomorrow morning. I hope he can tell something good news. Otherwsie, I am looking at moving to Canada. I feel that there is NO HOPE here is the US. I have a 4 year college degree and I am an LPN and still I cannot find a job!? That's totally ridiculous! Don't you think so???
  10. by   suzanne4
    You will still need to go thru Canadian immigration, many of the provinces are now requiring the four degree for practicing as an RN. And you won't find it easier getting a job there with an equivalent of the US LPN.

    Finding the job isn't your problem, getting a visa that will permit you to work is. Not sure why you went the route of 2 year LPN to begin with. Most programs are still one year in the US. And quite surprised that the guidance didn't suggest otherwise. Or the person that handled your student visa there. In my opinion, they should have offered the necessary guidance. Any one that told you that you would be able to get a job right away with the LPN was wrong, they may have just heard two year degree, but the degree has to be an RN, nothing lower.

    LPNs are not fast-tracked in the US in terms of working here or getting a green card, unfortunately they are added in to the list of everyone else that wishes to work in the US.

    There are programs that can be done on-line for this bridge program to getting your RN. That would probably be done quicker before you could get documents that would permit you to work in Canada.
  11. by   jbearmn
    Quote from suzanne4
    You will still need to go thru Canadian immigration, many of the provinces are now requiring the four degree for practicing as an RN. And you won't find it easier getting a job there with an equivalent of the US LPN.

    Finding the job isn't your problem, getting a visa that will permit you to work is. Not sure why you went the route of 2 year LPN to begin with. Most programs are still one year in the US. And quite surprised that the guidance didn't suggest otherwise. Or the person that handled your student visa there. In my opinion, they should have offered the necessary guidance. Any one that told you that you would be able to get a job right away with the LPN was wrong, they may have just heard two year degree, but the degree has to be an RN, nothing lower.

    LPNs are not fast-tracked in the US in terms of working here or getting a green card, unfortunately they are added in to the list of everyone else that wishes to work in the US.

    There are programs that can be done on-line for this bridge program to getting your RN. That would probably be done quicker before you could get documents that would permit you to work in Canada.
    Thank you Suzanne4! The reason I took a 2 year LPN program was my (previous now) immigration attorney's advice. 2.5 years ago, she told me that I can get the H1-B work visa or a permanent residency if I become either an LPN or an RN. I CLEARLY remember that she looked at some immigration law book and told me that I can be qualified for green card.

    To me honest with you, I lost my job by 9/11. I was an interpreter/translator for a Japanese business consulting company. I had a professional job. After 9/11, my work load got minimized. A friend of mine suggested that I should become a nurse becuase of the nurse shortage here in the US. I thought that that would be a great profession. Plus, my immigration attorney's advice let me got into Nursing. I have done lots of medical interpretation before. I though that the nursing knowledge helps me to be a professional medical interpreter as well. I just wanted to have the better financial situation after struggling to find a full time job. That's why I decided to study Nursing.

    However, it didn't work. Nothing works in the US! If I decide to move to Canada, I am not looking for an LPN position there since I have a 4 year college degree. However, I would like to know about "bridge program." Is it the same as an RN mobilty program?

    I went to several community colleges to find out the RN mobility program. The eariest I can finish this mobility program is in June 2007. I could take some pre-requisite classes and most classes are able to be transferred. Maybe, I just need to take less than 30 credits to complete this program. However, as an international student, I have to keep my international student status which I have to take at least 12 credits per semester, meaning that I have to take some extra classes. I don't know if I can afford extra classes...financially. I am not qualified for Finaical aid at all so.....

    It seems like I told you everything what I have done and what I'm trying to do. At this point, 80% for sure, I want to move to Canada and start over my original career. I mean I'm still interested in Nursing, but I think a profession with my 4 year college degree makes much more than an LPN anyway.

    Thanks for your advice. I appreciate that you gave me lots of ideas.
  12. by   suzanne4
    It is still going to take you some time before you could work in Canada, at a minimum. You still need to go thru their complete immigration process. Here you could do the same, but your wait could be four years or more.

    LPNs have never been accepted for the H1-B visa, if you look at the regs, it states professional degree. LPN is considered a technical degree, not a rpeofessional one in terms of immigration. And the H1-B visas are no longer available. Plus, you need to have a Visa Screen Certificate to work here as a nurse now, even for the H1-B visa, if it was available, and these are not available to LPNs. So unless you marry an American, you are stuck right now.

    I am not sure what your mobility program is but more than likely it is the same as a bridge program.
  13. by   dentru
    If I have a AAS degree from a College in USA, is it possible for me to get my work visa(H1)?

    Thanks

    Vikas

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