Going Saudi first - page 3

hello everyone.. I kinda need to know if my step in the process of my career is okey. I am going to accept an offer in Taif, Saudi Arabia on the same field that I am exposed in the Philippines.... Read More

  1. by   Multicollinearity
    Quote from EJM
    Yes, they live under Sharia Law. In fact if you steal you can get your right hand chopped off. Another form of punishment is public flogging. It is definitely NOT ideal. It is also the hardest country to get into. They do have areas where it is not so strict though. I pray one day this law will vanish.
    I think it's important for non-Muslim's to understand what it means to live under Sharia law. Under Sharia law, as in Saudi Arabia, non-Muslim's do not have have same rights and basic human worth as Muslims. For example, in a Saudi Sharia court, a non-Muslim's testimony is worth only a fraction compared to a Muslim's. Now if you are a female non-Muslim under Sharia law - worth even less.
  2. by   SuesquatchRN
    I need to clarify so that people don't think I'm talking out of my butt.

    My brother is fluent in Arabic and travels and works for the US on a diplomatic passport. He has lived in Israel, Egypt, Saudi Arabia and Iraq, and has travelled the region extensively, including to the Israeli territories, Syria, Lebanon, and Jordan. He is currently in Cairo. I have been to Egypt and would go back without hesitation.

    The only place he was ever frightened was in Saudi Arabia.
  3. by   Multicollinearity
    I think it's important to note that there are probably many wonderful Saudi citizens who aren't representative of what I posted above. Probably the more educated ones. It's the pervasive fundamentalism and Sharia law that scares me.
  4. by   VickyRN
    Saudi Arabia currently has one of the worst records of all countries on human rights and there is no freedom of religion. Christians in particular are targeted for abuse, discrimination, and persecution.
    Persecution can be especially brutal to Indian or Filipino foreign nationals temporarily residing in the Kingdom:
    Christian Persecution in Saudi Arabia
    Saudi Arabia Christian Persecution Profile

    Beware...
  5. by   GardenDove
    Thank you Vicky for posting that. We Americans try hard to be tolerant, and, yes, there are many wonderful Muslim people. But let's not let our natural tendency to think the best of those who differ from us to blind us to the glaring human rights problems in Saudi Arabia. A Filipina woman will not have the world's only superpower to back her up.
  6. by   Multicollinearity
    Saudi Arabia: execution of Nigerian men and women - Amnesty International

    "Saudi Arabia has one of the highest rates of capital punishment in the world. Of the 766 executions recorded by Amnesty International between 1990 and 1999, over half were of migrant workers and other foreign nationals.

    Saudi Arabia has expanded the scope of the death penalty to cover a wide range of offences, including offences without lethal consequences such as apostasy, drug dealing, sodomy and ''witchcraft''. The scores of people who are executed every year, many for non-violent crimes, are put to death after summary trials that offer them no opportunity to defend themselves and almost no protection against miscarriages of justice.

    Execution is by public beheading for men and, according to reports, by firing squad or beheading for women, sometimes in public. Foreign nationals are sometimes not even aware that they have been sentenced to death and neither they nor their families are warned in advance of the date of execution. They are rarely if ever allowed to see their loved ones before they are executed."
  7. by   weetziebat
    Well, the OP hasn't been back and it now seems to be a battle between the rest of us. I really don't want to fight about it - every country has good and bad. If you search around you can find facts to back up just about any opinion.

    Personally, I loved the time I spent in Saudi Arabia. They spend a fortune to keep it amazingly green, have a cool mountainous portion of the country, the breathtaking oasis at Hofuf where there must be hundreds of acres of palm trees, the Red Sea has fantastic diving, beautiful beaches on the Persian gulf - and, no, you won't find anyone in bathing suits lying on the sand - but no one stops you from taking off your shoes, rolling up your slacks and wading up to your knees. Nor did I have on my abaya or head scarf. Just slacks and a tee shirt.

    Everywhere is air-conditioned, and (I swear I'm telling the truth) I never met a Saudi who was anything less than friendly, respectful and willing to go out of their way to be helpful. Oh, except that one old man who was a sitter for his grandson at the hospital. He grabbed at my chest and when I told the Saudi interpreter, all hell broke loose. They grabbed the guy and four Saudi men lit into him about how wrong that was and gave him a 20 minute lecture, then made him apologize to me.

    If you read American statistics on murders, rapes and violent crime it would scare the bravest person. And, for all our freedoms, we fear walking alone at night in any large city. That is a fear my friends and I never felt in Riyadh. Maybe cause they behead murderers, rapists and drug dealers.

    Just my .
  8. by   rn/writer
    Quote from weetziebat
    Well, the OP hasn't been back and it now seems to be a battle between the rest of us. I really don't want to fight about it - every country has good and bad. If you search around you can find facts to back up just about any opinion.

    Personally, I loved the time I spent in Saudi Arabia. They spend a fortune to keep it amazingly green, have a cool mountainous portion of the country, the breathtaking oasis at Hofuf where there must be hundreds of acres of palm trees, the Red Sea has fantastic diving, beautiful beaches on the Persian gulf - and, no, you won't find anyone in bathing suits lying on the sand - but no one stops you from taking off your shoes, rolling up your slacks and wading up to your knees. Nor did I have on my abaya or head scarf. Just slacks and a tee shirt.

    Everywhere is air-conditioned, and (I swear I'm telling the truth) I never met a Saudi who was anything less than friendly, respectful and willing to go out of their way to be helpful. Oh, except that one old man who was a sitter for his grandson at the hospital. He grabbed at my chest and when I told the Saudi interpreter, all hell broke loose. They grabbed the guy and four Saudi men lit into him about how wrong that was and gave him a 20 minute lecture, then made him apologize to me.

    If you read American statistics on murders, rapes and violent crime it would scare the bravest person. And, for all our freedoms, we fear walking alone at night in any large city. That is a fear my friends and I never felt in Riyadh. Maybe cause they behead murderers, rapists and drug dealers.

    Just my .
    It's good to hear that you had a positive experience. The OP might find herself more vulnerable being from the Phillipines. She has much to consider before making a year-long committment.
  9. by   weetziebat
    Quote from rn/writer
    It's good to hear that you had a positive experience. The OP might find herself more vulnerable being from the Phillipines. She has much to consider before making a year-long committment.
    I agree that anyone would have much to consider moving half way round the world to any country, but the statistics you read about Filippinos having problems in Saudi are the uneducated folks who take jobs as housemaids, nannies etc. - where they live in the families home and are subject to the families rules and way of life.

    Many times they are taken advantage of by the segment of the population who feels women coming abroad alone are sort of like property. There are many cases of kidnapped women from abroad being kept hostage even in the U.S.

    The nurses working in hospitals are in a far different situation. But I'm tired of trying to point out that everyone is welcomed to their own opinion. Was just telling Barbie my experience as I lived there for eight years. Certainly no one is forced to go there, and the decision is entirely up to her.

    And folks, I am OUT of these Saudi posts. Many people see only what they want to and that's fine with me.

    Good luck with whatever you decide, Barbie.
  10. by   Multicollinearity
    Quote from weetziebat
    I agree that anyone would have much to consider moving half way round the world to any country, but the statistics you read about Filippinos having problems in Saudi are the uneducated folks who take jobs as housemaids, nannies etc. - where they live in the families home and are subject to the families rules and way of life.

    Many times they are taken advantage of by the segment of the population who feels women coming abroad alone are sort of like property. There are many cases of kidnapped women from abroad being kept hostage even in the U.S.

    The nurses working in hospitals are in a far different situation. But I'm tired of trying to point out that everyone is welcomed to their own opinion. Was just telling Barbie my experience as I lived there for eight years. Certainly no one is forced to go there, and the decision is entirely up to her.

    And folks, I am OUT of these Saudi posts. Many people see only what they want to and that's fine with me.

    Good luck with whatever you decide, Barbie.
    Weetzie,

    I'm sorry that you don't like our responses. Maybe you don't feel respected for your first-hand experience. I'm sorry for that.

    I tried to acknowledge that while I hold my opinions, I also stated that I've never been off of the North American continent. I was trying to give a nod to you that you've actually been there.

    I'm sure that my aunt and uncle's experience living there in the 90's has contributed to my opinions. My uncle is an engineer. They lived in Kuwait and also Saudi Arabia during his engineering contract work for a few years. My aunt who is Caucasian spoke about how she was harassed by the religious police at times. For example, if her arms were showing too much in a restaurant, etc. They lived in a quite nice compound for the foreign engineers. My aunt was afraid there. She said Saudi Arabia scared her the most of any of the Middle-East countries that they had lived and worked in.

    I think we should be able to state our opinions - both sides and all of the shades of gray. While I understand that you had a good experience, I can't feel good about a country that doesn't allow women to participate as full citizens and operates under fundamentalist Sharia law. We should be able to all share our opinions and still hold respect in the picture.
    Last edit by Multicollinearity on Dec 14, '06
  11. by   greenmiler
    Barbie, Don't do it..waiting for the US is far better than the potential problems you could run into over there; its not getting better for females; its getting worse. Its getting more oppresive and dangerous for everyone...just my opinion

    Paul
  12. by   BonesGilmore
    When you guys say that Saudi is oppresive, dangerous and generally an unsafe country, does it directly apply to being nurses?

    My bestfriend's mom works as RN in one of the cold places in Saudi and she wants to take her daughter (my friend) with her there to work. I have not talked directly to my bestfriend's mom but she says to my friend that saudi is a good palce to work and the boarding house & food are paid for. Plus, they welcome new graduates even without an experience (which is my & my besfriend's situation). Isn't her wanting to take her daughter with her (and us too) there in Saudi to work says a lot that Saudi is a safe place for nurses?

    I'm thinking kasi of gaining my experience in Saudi instead of here in the Philippines.
  13. by   Multicollinearity

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