Writing the Prescription to Fix Broken Nurse Practitioner (NP) Education (Pt. I) - page 6

NURSE PRACTITIONER HISTORY When Drs. Loretta Ford, RN and Henry Silver, MD developed the first NP certificate program in 1965 it provided experienced registered nurses (RN) with the additional... Read More

  1. by   lwsoccjs
    I still lol whenever I see a statement that is short sided like the residency idea. Yeah, it’s a good idea but how do you suppose we make it efficient for the thousands of graduating students. Some easy math. There are approximately 350 NP programs in the USA according to AANP. Of course, more schools will continue to pop up as the credentialing obviously is not very rigorous. Let's say on the small side each program accepts 30 students per cohort. That is 10,500 student every year graduating. This does not include programs that accept many more or the programs that have rolling admissions. Each residency accepts between 1-5 students give or take. This allows a possible 1:100 chance of getting one at best. Residency is not going to save the current model we have.
  2. by   juan de la cruz
    It's a matter of finding a source of funding. GME programs for physicians are largely publicly funded by CMS. Our university/medical center has secured funding for post-graduate training for NP's in primary care in the past and we currently have a 1-year Adult Critical Care and Surgical fellowship for AGACNP's with 2 fellows accepted each year going on it's third year now. That's the available funding the university is able to currently secure. It currently attracts a good amount of applicants but one of the downsides of such program is that the monthly stipend does not come close to what a nurse in the Bay Area can potentially make in a month. That in itself, dissuades potential talented candidates.
  3. by   shibaowner
    Quote from lwsoccjs
    I still lol whenever I see a statement that is short sided like the residency idea. Yeah, it’s a good idea but how do you suppose we make it efficient for the thousands of graduating students. Some easy math. There are approximately 350 NP programs in the USA according to AANP. Of course, more schools will continue to pop up as the credentialing obviously is not very rigorous. Let's say on the small side each program accepts 30 students per cohort. That is 10,500 student every year graduating. This does not include programs that accept many more or the programs that have rolling admissions. Each residency accepts between 1-5 students give or take. This allows a possible 1:100 chance of getting one at best. Residency is not going to save the current model we have.
    I don't care how many NP schools there are. The crap graduates will not get hired. If there are too many NP schools, there will not be enough preceptors, so the crap schools won't get preceptors - no preceptors means no clinicals - no clinicals means students will not become NPs. Sometimes, doing nothing is the solution! We have a (somewhat free) market economy - supply and demand. If there are too many NP new grads, only the best will be hired. As other posters have indicated, there is funding enough for all the MD internships and residencies. If we can get funding for NP residences, these programs will increase. There is a glut of lawyers right now, but I doubt the new grad law students from schools like Harvard, Yale, Stanford, UCLA, etc have trouble finding jobs!
  4. by   cjcsoon2bnp
    Quote from shibaowner
    I don't care how many NP schools there are. The crap graduates will not get hired. If there are too many NP schools, there will not be enough preceptors, so the crap schools won't get preceptors - no preceptors means no clinicals - no clinicals means students will not become NPs. Sometimes, doing nothing is the solution! We have a (somewhat free) market economy - supply and demand. If there are too many NP new grads, only the best will be hired. As other posters have indicated, there is funding enough for all the MD internships and residencies. If we can get funding for NP residences, these programs will increase. There is a glut of lawyers right now, but I doubt the new grad law students from schools like Harvard, Yale, Stanford, UCLA, etc have trouble finding jobs!
    I understand the the idea of supply/demand and the concept that quality programs will produce quality graduates and only quality graduates will get jobs. However, I can't seem to get past my personal experience of seeing recently hired NPs in my faculty being poorly prepared to start in the role that they are hired for (Community ED/ER) and it is creating a preference for hiring PAs instead of NPs because it is felt that the PAs are better prepared. I think that when offices/facilities have a bad experience with a new provider because they feel like they are not well educated or prepared for their role then they tend to be quick to generalize the program where the person graduated and if it becomes a pattern then the entire profession gets blamed. The recent NP hires have come from schools with good/strong reputations, some havinf previous RN experience while others were accelerated/direct entry and they all seem equally unprepared for the role even as a novice practitioner.

    I will openly acknowledge that this is only my personal experience and does not constitute as concrete evidence for anything. It is merely a single pattern in one facility, in one part of the country.

    !Chris

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Writing the Prescription to Fix Broken Nurse Practitioner (NP) Education (Pt. I)