Will RN from Non Accredited School keep me from bridging to MSN

  1. 0
    Hello! I am considering attending a community college that is not accredited yet to get my RN (ADN), will this make me not competitive for bridging programs to MSN? I want to be an FNP ultimately.
  2. Get the Hottest Nursing Topics Straight to Your Inbox!

  3. 1,500 Views
    Find Similar Topics
  4. 3 Comments so far...

  5. 0
    My advice to you is don't waste your time. If the school you choose is not accredited, after you graduate your not considered board eligable so you cant sit for the nclex. Most masters programs (if not all) state in their admission requirements that an applicant must have a current license to practice in what ever state their located in. Which means you pretty much wasted your time. Find an accredited bsn program so you can save yourself the headache lol
  6. 0
    Well I'm sure this program allows you to sit for the NCLEX so I would be able to be an RN upon passing the boards, just didn't know how much it would matter as far as continuing education for my transfer credits. It's Nashville State Community College if anyone knows anything about it. Thanks!
  7. 1
    Quote from blucrna
    My advice to you is don't waste your time. If the school you choose is not accredited, after you graduate your not considered board eligable so you cant sit for the nclex.
    There is no state in the US that requires NLNAC or CCNE accreditation for licensure -- simple approval by the state BON is all that is necessary. There seems to be a lot of confusion on this site about this point (the difference between BON approval and accreditation). Accreditation by the NLNAC or CCNE is a voluntary process by a school that shows that the school meets a higher standard than the minimum necessary for licensure.

    However, OP, it is true that a lot of programs for furthering your education, whether BSN completion programs or graduate programs, will require applicants to be graduates of accredited (NLNAC or CCNE). Also, a growing number of healthcare employers, inc. some of the more desirable healthcare employers in the US (US military, VA system, lots of academic medical centers), will only hire graduates of accredited programs.

    That certainly doesn't mean that all accredited programs are automatically good and all non-accredited programs are automatically bad. There are plenty of good programs that have just chosen not to pursue accreditation (it is a time-consuming and expensive process). However, esp. these days and in this economic climate, I can't think of any rationale for closing the door on any future educational and employment opportunities this early in the process. With nursing school accreditation, like so many other things in life, it's "better to have it and not need it, than to need it and not have it."

    Best wishes for your journey!
    CCRNDiva likes this.


Top