Obgyn/womens health np

  1. 0
    Hi guys,

    I am not even near this accomplishment yet (im still in undergrad). But my ultimate goal is to become an fnp working in women's health. Generally my dream job would be in a gynecology doctors office or clinic. My question is for the fnp's who have accomplished this.

    What steps did you take to get here? I mean I know the basics, get a bachelors in nursing and then attend fnp school. But how did you specialize. Did you attend general fnp school, or did you go to a school specifically for women's health? Did you have RN experience before going into np school or did you go straight in? If you didn't have RN experience, how hard was it to find a job after graduation from np school?

    Lastly, do you like your job? Do you have not enough, just right, or too much responsibility?
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  4. 15 Comments so far...

  5. 0
    I thinks its a good idea to work as a RN even if you go directly through to the NP program. I did FNP. There are all types of programs. You can do Womens health NP program if you like. I worked as a RN for 8 years prior to becoming a NP. It does help because there are things your pt experiences in the hospital that they expect you to know. Like I had a pt that is doing peritoneal dialysis at home and I was able to explain it to him as I have done it as a RN in the hospital. Even though he is going to a Nephrologist, no one really explained the purpose and how it works to the pt. So naturally he asked me. So you will run into things like that all the time. Its a valuable experience, even if you do it part time. Best wishes and Congrats
  6. 0
    Tinabeanen- you make a good point. I do definately want some rn experience before being a working np. I just don't want to wait so long to become an np. I guess I just assumed that working during a np program wouldn't be possible. But I guess doing a part time job would be doable
  7. 0
    Yea you can work Part time. It will be a good experience for you
  8. 0
    How do u like being an fnp? Was it what you expected? Do you feel like your np program prepared you well? In what kind of setting do you work? Sorry for all the questions. Thanks in advance! =)
  9. 1
    Quote from Nurseinthemaking20
    How do u like being an fnp? Was it what you expected? Do you feel like your np program prepared you well? In what kind of setting do you work? Sorry for all the questions. Thanks in advance! =)
    Not directed at me but I will answer anyways

    I am a FNP and I had a number of job offers at graduation. I chose to join a internal medicine practice where I see only adults. I see patients in clinic three days a week and spend one day a week in the hospital managing our patients that are admitted. I felt very well prepared for practice and this was due to some fantastic clinical placements combined with a wonderful clinical mentor that allowed me to start with only a few patients (plus sick call) a day and slowly ramp up. It was a fairly easy transition but I also consult with colleagues many times a day (and will do this throughout my career). I don't always know the answers; but I feel confident that I know what's "not right" and who to call about it. I recently took a job for fun moonlighting on an onc service to keep my skills sharp as its an area of interest for me.

    It's what I expected when I graduated; it's not exactly what I expected when I started my graduate degree.
    Tinabeanrn likes this.
  10. 1
    Hi, I LOVE being a FNP compared to nursing. Truly feel I am making a difference in my patient's lives. EVERYTHING and I do mean EVERYTHING that I learned in school I use on a daiy bases in clinical practice. I work in a true family practice. I mostly see Internal Medicine Adult patients. I see some peds, some GYN and a few preggers pts. I loved and miss school. It was a great learning experience and really did prepare me. There are a few things they could have done better with... Labs, Newborn baby and Pregnant women's assessments. I saw those things in clinical but would have liked to have had that in my assessment class as well. Other than that, I feel really prepared. I am doing really well. The docs all like me and say that their only complaint is that I didn't start sooner. I actually have been practicing for 5 months. I have learned so much! It is what I expected and some, lol. I feel like a resident, because just as the previous poster said, I ask questons. A lot of times I ask questions to politely point out the stuff they missed. I also ask questions for my own knowledge. I have even taught my fellow MDs a thing or two and reminded them of things they forgot about. I'm the only NP and there are 5 Physicians. They are all so very nice! I am the first NP for the practice, which was really scary. But they truly like me for the most part and I feel so happy and honored to be a part of the team. I want to see more kids but I feel scared that the parents won't want a NP or that I may not know enough. So far so good though! Keep me in your prayers and best of luck to you! You can ALWAYS ask me questions. I love questions and helping ppl. Sincerely
    Last edit by Tinabeanrn on Feb 11, '13
    KathrynMP likes this.
  11. 0
    I am so glad to hear such positive responses about the np path! See, at first my aspiration was ya know the typical RN path working in a hospital. And I still do want to experience that. That is still part of my dream. But I want to go further. I want to specialize or I could also see myself doing family practice.

    On another note, something I am also concerned about in my path in healthcare. Are you guys required to get seasonal flu shots for your jobs? Also, since you guys are professionals, what is your take on the flu shot? I'm just curious because I know that there currently is a push for mandatory flu shots for nurses working in hospitals.
  12. 0
    Quote from Nurseinthemaking20
    I am so glad to hear such positive responses about the np path! See, at first my aspiration was ya know the typical RN path working in a hospital. And I still do want to experience that. That is still part of my dream. But I want to go further. I want to specialize or I could also see myself doing family practice.

    On another note, something I am also concerned about in my path in healthcare. Are you guys required to get seasonal flu shots for your jobs? Also, since you guys are professionals, what is your take on the flu shot? I'm just curious because I know that there currently is a push for mandatory flu shots for nurses working in hospitals.
    As I am sure you are aware that is a hotly debated issue. I am required to have a current flu shot as part of my privileges at the hospital. I don't have any colleagues that refuse them, that I am aware of.

    If note, you will likely have to have them as part of your graduate degree.
  13. 0
    Yes, I know it is a hot debate. I am not either against or for it. I have heard plenty of expert opinions suggesting that it is perfectly safe, while I've also heard opinions that it could be harmful. I guess that's why I'm asking, because it is something that I preferred to avoid if possible. I don't think I need the flu shot because I am healthy and I believe I can fight off the flu perfectly fine. However, I DEFINATELY understand requiring a flu shot for patient safety. Basically I am not truly against getting one, but my significant other does not want me to. He thinks it leads to long term health issues etc. Im trying to be considerate of my significant others opinion however, I don't see how I'm going to avoid flu shots throughout nursing school and graduate school. I am at a loss on this one, that's why I'm asking for professional opinions it. What do u guys think, is the flu shot perfectly safe?


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