To be or not to be a Nurse Practitioner?

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    hey guys! I have always had this dream of becoming a Nurse Practitioner. I am to get in the program next year, but I'm scared that I may not be making the right move, reason being, I have not met 1 NP that has encouraged me to do it, and that it is worth it. They all complain of the many hours they have to work being call alot, legas issues like being sued alot etc. They all say that if they had to do it all over, they would have stayed just RN's. Please, any positive thoughts and experiences out there?
    Thanks,
    joan Olisa
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  3. 6 Comments so far...

  4. 3
    joanolisa-- I have been a nurse for over 30 years - beginning the career ladder as an LPN when I graduated from high school -- went straight on into a BSN program but worked part time while going to school - I graduated in 1983 - did floor nursing for about a year and then moved into ER nursing - later becoming the director of that ER for 14 years -- I always wanted to be a NP but I got married and had kids and then where I lived no programs available - but then in the mid 90's UTHSCSA started nurse practitioner programs - so at the age of 37 I went back to school full time - worked fulltime - and graduated in 1999 with MSN and FNP -- I have to say that I LOVE being a nurse practitioner - It is the best career move I ever made although it took me a while to get there -- It is challenging, hard work but the rewards in the end are many -- You just have to find the right job out there for YOU -- I did family practice in a small rural clinic for 3 years - lots of autonomy - saws lots of families - it was so rewarding and I was devastated when they closed the clinic ( it was hospital owned ) so I had to go look for a job after working for that hospital for 22 years - anyway I ended up working for 2 cardiologists and have grown my job over the past 7 1/2 years - It is hard work most of the time but it is great to be autonomous - It is all worthwhile when you get a hug from a patient as they are leaving the office saying thanks for taking care of me - or the card you receive thanking you for taking such good care of them - or the comments they make to their friends about the care you give them and then it comes back as a compliment from someone - or to have someone you just meet say to you " Oh you are the Melanie that Mrs so and so talks about all the time and how good you take care of them : All of this makes the job worth it - You just need to find the right job for you when you get out of school - it may not be the first one you take - but network with other NP's - Almost all physicians are using midlevels in their practices anywhere from peds to derm- to allergy - to research to ER- to cardiology - to even hospitals employing NP's as hospitalists types if that is your bag- I again think that being a NP is a wonderful profession - many nurses that I have worked with over the years have gone back to NP school - I precept alot of NP students in both my settings ( cardiology and ER) and love showing students that being an NP is a Great job - Keep that dream alive if it is what you truly want - I don't know what part of the country you live in but again I can't emphasize networking - we have a group of NP/PA's here that meets monthly and we encourage students to join us - many of us precept and bring our students others hear about it - they get lots of tips on jobs etc -- I wish you the best of luck should you decide to go on to school
    ALP RN, Sparx28, and Purple_Scrubs like this.
  5. 1
    Hi,

    I'm a new NP who took the plunge and made a complete career change from another health care profession. I have not regretted my decision for one moment. I love what I do. I work in an urban community health center and deal with adult patients with issues from hypertension to UTIs to rashes. Every day is a learning experience for me. I don't have to be on call or work holidays. I work in a great supportive environment where the NPs and MDs truly collaborate, but yet I am still fairly autonomous. I can't wait to precept NP students once I get a couple of years of experience. I think being an NP is extremely rewarding, and would encourage you to go back to school if this is your dream.
    raeenna likes this.
  6. 0
    Quote from melmorris
    joanolisa-- I have been a nurse for over 30 years - beginning the career ladder as an LPN when I graduated from high school -- went straight on into a BSN program but worked part time while going to school - I graduated in 1983 - did floor nursing for about a year and then moved into ER nursing - later becoming the director of that ER for 14 years -- I always wanted to be a NP but I got married and had kids and then where I lived no programs available - but then in the mid 90's UTHSCSA started nurse practitioner programs - so at the age of 37 I went back to school full time - worked fulltime - and graduated in 1999 with MSN and FNP -- I have to say that I LOVE being a nurse practitioner - It is the best career move I ever made although it took me a while to get there -- It is challenging, hard work but the rewards in the end are many -- You just have to find the right job out there for YOU -- I did family practice in a small rural clinic for 3 years - lots of autonomy - saws lots of families - it was so rewarding and I was devastated when they closed the clinic ( it was hospital owned ) so I had to go look for a job after working for that hospital for 22 years - anyway I ended up working for 2 cardiologists and have grown my job over the past 7 1/2 years - It is hard work most of the time but it is great to be autonomous - It is all worthwhile when you get a hug from a patient as they are leaving the office saying thanks for taking care of me - or the card you receive thanking you for taking such good care of them - or the comments they make to their friends about the care you give them and then it comes back as a compliment from someone - or to have someone you just meet say to you " Oh you are the Melanie that Mrs so and so talks about all the time and how good you take care of them : All of this makes the job worth it - You just need to find the right job for you when you get out of school - it may not be the first one you take - but network with other NP's - Almost all physicians are using midlevels in their practices anywhere from peds to derm- to allergy - to research to ER- to cardiology - to even hospitals employing NP's as hospitalists types if that is your bag- I again think that being a NP is a wonderful profession - many nurses that I have worked with over the years have gone back to NP school - I precept alot of NP students in both my settings ( cardiology and ER) and love showing students that being an NP is a Great job - Keep that dream alive if it is what you truly want - I don't know what part of the country you live in but again I can't emphasize networking - we have a group of NP/PA's here that meets monthly and we encourage students to join us - many of us precept and bring our students others hear about it - they get lots of tips on jobs etc -- I wish you the best of luck should you decide to go on to school

    What are some good online FNP schools? I need flexibilty because we have 3 kids. I currently work in the Information Systems area in my hospital and I am thinking about going back to the NICU (where I used to work) since I am considering going to FNP school? Any suggestions will be helpful.
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    I do not know where you are located - I only know of a few on line schools -- I have precepted students from Texas Tech and Vanderbilt who both offer distance learning -These are the only ones I have knowledge about but I am sure there are lots out there- If you are wanting to move back to the NICU - then you might want to explore a neonatal nurse practitioner program rather than an FNP -- although the NNP program would greatly limit your work opportunities it would probably prepare you better for that type of job - not to say that someone trained in an FNP program couldn't work in a NICU-Good luck - you will love being a nurse practitioner if you find the right job for you.
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    I am located in SC and I am currently enrolled in University of Phoenix MHA program and I don't think that this is for me. I originally wanted to do FNP but thought that there were no online programs. I really need an online NP program to be flexible and catered to individuals like myself who work fulltime and have kids. I have been looking at Ball State, University of Cincinatti and I am going to check into the University of Phoenix's NP program. I want to do FNP because I believe there will be more opportunities for jobs versus a NNP. I am going to go back to work in the NICU so that I can have days off when I need to do clinicals becasue I know that my current job will not allow me that flexibility for clinical time. Thanks for the advice. I will appreciate any suggestions and advice. Thanks again.
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    I am about a year away from becoming an FNP. I'm doing my MSN-FNP through Walden and I LOVE IT!! It is an excellent program. I did my BSN through a very reputable university and have been very impressed with Walden's program!


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