Going from a "retiring" certificate to a "new" certificate

  1. 0
    [color=#2f4f4f]so, its no secret that i'm an adult health cns and that is one of the certifications that ancc will soon be "retiring."

    has anyone else considered going back to school?

    i also have a peds cns so am looking at a post-msn fnp.

    since i've already done two complete programs - along with the required two courses (adult and peds) of adv pharm, adv assess, advanced pathophys + 1200 hours of clinic, i'm totally loathe to commit to another 12-40 hours of msn education.


    ugh - anyone else any other ideas? what are you all doing?
  2. 19 Comments so far...

  3. 0
    Trauma, why do you feel the need to go back?? Although it's retired you still work in that capacity right?? Or I missing something?
  4. 0
    Yes, I can but I worthy about the future - what else will change?
  5. 0
    I'm willing to wait it out and see what further instructions ANCC will come up with as far as qualifications to sit for the new Adult and Gero ACNP. If it's doable (i.e., a 3-credit Gero class and a semester of Gero clinical), I might do the extra schoolwork just so I have a non-retired credential in the future. But for now, I and the rest of my ACNP colleagues don't see any hindrance to how we practice since we only deal with adults and up in the ICU. The Gero population we deal with are critically-ill and currently, no certification (by either ANCC or AANP) prepares you for caring for this particular population at least in theory.
  6. 0
    I'm interested in hearing what you all are planning on doing as well. I'm on track for graduation in Spring of 2013 but I don't know if I will qualify for the new certification or not. I'm kind of irritated with the whole situation, to tell you the truth. If this is the path nursing is going to continue on, I don't know if I'm willing to stay on board. I guess I will have to wait and see.
  7. 0
    I'm not considering returning to school at this point.
  8. 0
    My purpose of considering some more education, is that I'm both an adult as well as peds CNS. In my practice, I'm the only CNS, the rest are PAs and FNPs.

    I worry that the adult CNS will now be considered to be inferior to the still current FNP.
  9. 2
    I worry that the adult CNS will now be considered to be inferior to the still current FNP.
    That could be concerning. I agree.

    I can't blame you for considering the FNP at all.

    As long as you do not allow your certification to lapse or move to another State, your CNS certs should be o.k.

    I know, the word, "should", is concerning.

    I'm with elkpark......I have no plans for another degree/certification should mine be retired.
    Psychcns and traumaRUs like this.
  10. 0
    In theory, our state certifications as NP's (or CNS') will remain intact as long as we keep our national certification. ANCC reassures its certificants that renewals are still going to be possible even after one's credential is retired. Besides, some states do not require national certification anyway.

    TraumaRUs, in my opinion, your value as a provider does not hinge as much on what letters follow your name. You have been in your specialty for a long time and have many years of nursing experience before that. To me, that will count more to people that make decisions on who is a better asset to a team (i.e., hiring physicians and group practices). Few years from now, new NP's (or CNS') will come out with the new and improved credentials but they are behind you in terms of experience.

    Finally, scope of practice is dictated by your state BON anyway, not ANCC.
    Last edit by juan de la cruz on Jan 18, '12
  11. 0
    Thanks Juan. What you say is true.

    At this point, I'm just considering returning but not sure I'll get up the nerve to do it.


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