Can you work as an R.N. after you obtain a N.P. degree?

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    I am in a direct entry program to obtain a R.N. and N.P. degree. I'm almost done with the R.N. portion of the program and I'm wondering if I could continue to work as an R.N. after I finish the N.P. If so, how many hours are required each week or year as an N.P. to keep one's license? I know this may vary by State- I live in Massachusetts. Thanks for any information you might have!

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  2. 10 Comments...

  3. 0
    This is frought with issues: you will always be held accountable to the highest licensure that you hold. So even if you work as an RN, you will be held to the NP standard. Here is a link to NSO and you might want to read #6:FAQ for how to apply for professional liability insurance coverage through NSO.
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    I had the same question as the OP
  5. 0
    Quote from kjc07002
    I am in a direct entry program to obtain a R.N. and N.P. degree. I'm almost done with the R.N. portion of the program and I'm wondering if I could continue to work as an R.N. after I finish the N.P. If so, how many hours are required each week or year as an N.P. to keep one's license? I know this may vary by State- I live in Massachusetts. Thanks for any information you might have!
    I work in a California ICU and I have (at least) two colleagues that are FNPs that work alongside me as RNs. They have both been FNPs greater than five years I believe, and neither seemed overly concerned when I brought up the conflict of RN versus FNP standards and scopes.
  6. 1
    That's because they haven't been taken to court....yet!!!

    Hopefully they have their own malpractice insurance.
    elkpark likes this.
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    I know an NP that works on my floor as a RN. Hasnt been a problem.
  8. 1
    Quote from nitasarn
    I know an NP that works on my floor as a RN. Hasnt been a problem.
    It isn't a problem -- until a situation suddenly turns out badly enough to end up in court, and then it suddenly is a problem (or, at least, may be a problem, depending on the situation).

    I've worked as a staff RN in the past, with my CNS certification, and it's certainly possible to do, but, IMO, it's important to understand the legal implications and potential risks one is taking on by doing so.
    caliotter3 likes this.
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    Well, the legal experts say that you should possess liability insurance for a nurse practitioner even if you are working in a non-NP role (i.e., a staff RN on a hospital unit). The rationale being your highest education and training is the standard to which you are held to regardless of your role. However, I have noticed that some states are more permissive of nurses who are certified as NP's working in a non-NP role particularly as bedside RN's. California for instance, have many direct entry NP programs and many graduates of those programs do work as bedside RN's here with a few eventually transitioning to an NP position later on. The other reason is that nursing salaries in parts of California does not have a huge difference between a bedside RN and a new grad NP.
    CCRNDiva likes this.
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    I'm currently working in Chicago and I've noticed a significant number of advanced practice RNs remain or return to the bedside due to pay. It is not uncommon for bedside RNs with 10+ years of experience to make 6 figures (not including overtime) here. Oddly, NPs and CNS' often start at much lower salaries in this area.
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    That is true downstate IL also CCRNDiva - when I got my CNS, I stayed a staff nurse for 4 months and really almost decided not to get certified as my staff nurse job was very fulfilling to me and I would have made less if I had been hired at that hospital as a new APN.
    CCRNDiva likes this.


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