Need help from an experienced nurse who has dealt with patients involved in twelve-st

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    hi everyone,
    i am currently writing a paper on the history and evolution of the twelve-step program and i need to find out, from a nurse who has worked with addiction clients, about how it has evolved over the years. for example, i've found that there are twelve-step programs for people suffering from internet addiction, sex addiction, job addiction, etc... can anyone tell me how this type of program has worked for addicts? and offer me other information regarding its wide-spread impact on the way we deal with addicts.
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    Try GoogleScholar. Anonymous posts on the internet are not sources.
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    this would seem like a simple response but it is by far more complicated than i can explain. i have been involved in addictions nursing since 1987. currently i work in a free standing detoxification center but have had years of experience working on chemical dependency units both in patient and out patient. the 12 step programs like aa, na, ga are all from the same root; fellowships of people who share their experience and derive strength and hope from each other so they can help themselves and others recover from their addiction as was the foundation of aa in 1935. i believe it to be that the twelve step fellowships hold an intuitive core belief that individuals suffering from an addictive disorder are vulnerable to all drugs and not just the drug they are dependent on at the time of treatment. this validates the fact that "cross addiction is the rule never the exception" and in my experience that there is no such thing as "controlled drinking or drug use". individuals that are in long term recovery verify that compete abstinence is the foundation of sobriety and recovery. we have always emphasized to our patients to avoid all mood altering substances and behaviors i find it difficult to accept a patients lament that they "don't like" twelve step because of the "religious". or higher power aspect of the fellowship i try to teach them that spirituality and religion are not always related. also in my experience the alternatives to 12 step programs do not have the success that twelve step does. i often tell patients that they don't have to like it but it is absolutely necessary they become involved or at least make an effort to become part of this fellowship. long term i think that involvement of the larger community is extremely valuable to survive the pressures and stresses of life without drugs and alcohol. my opinion is that chemical dependency treatment programs should no allow "core groups" but emphasize the addictive disorder thinking and mandate attendance at aa, ga na, oea. this helps to deal with the "elitism" of being an "alcoholic" versus a "drug addict". i hope this gives you a little insight into my way of thinking about how to best care for these clients looking to a long term sobriety and recovery
    Mozombies likes this.
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    Alcohol, drugs, food, sex, shopping, gambling.... All addictions are at their core related in the way that the addicts mind operates. We call it "stinking thinking" in the rooms and it's universal in addicts of any kind. The 12 steps (if done honestly and thoroughly) help one to discover and address their character defects and learn about how their brain operates. Truly, I could go on and on for days about this subject but basically I believe that it's the only program that really and truly works if the person in it is thoroughly honest and teachable. There is a degree of humbleness that is required for this to work. For any addict, their ego is usually their biggest enemy! I too try to encourage my patients to look at spirituality and religion as separate entities. Usually, though, the complaint of not wanting to attend meetings because of "religion"is simply their addiction speaking. Addiction is an awful beast and he does not want to go away quietly! Good luck!


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