How did/do you pay for nursing school? - page 3

by brian Admin

19,470 Views | 92 Comments

Nursing school is expensive. Many people have used student loans, scholarships, VA loans, grants, and even worked through school to pay for their education. The main reason for this thread is to provide information for people... Read More


  1. 4
    $26k in student right here!

    Holla!

    /sarcasm
    vol4life03, joanna73, JBingo, and 1 other like this.
  2. 0
    i feel spoiled but my parents are paying!
  3. 0
    Lost my career after a corporate buyout and subsequent closure of manufacturing facilities and elimination of the corporate engineering and research and development departments. Because it was a job loss due to foreign competition, we all received Trade Act Assistance. That paid for up to 24 months of school, all books, tuition and suppiles except computers, and there was an extended unemployment benefit that went with that, as well.

    Trade Act Program: TAA for Workers, Employment & Training Administration (ETA) - U.S. Department of Labor

    Unfortunately, I chose a diploma school with a funky "integrated" curriculum that totally didn't mesh with my very systematic "block" style of learning. I completed one year of the school before I bailed out. But the TRA/TAA funding is one training, one time, and not transferable, so I lost that when I quit. I knew I was at the wrong school before the first term was up, but I had to either continue there or lose the funding, so I soldered on for a year. To use TRA/TAA, you must be a full-time student and the school must be on the approved Trade Act provider list, and the training can't take more than 24 months. I was pretty much stuck with that diploma school because it was the only thing that met all 3 requirements. Associate degree college courses were out, because I have too many transfer credits to ever be full time there. It was a very depressing and discouraging experience, but at least I have no debts from it. And if I choose to try RN or LPN at some later date, that weird integrated curriculum gave me probably as much background as ADRNs have covered in 1.5 year, which would make a second try much easier than the first trip around. Before I picked RN, I did a lot of research and I interviewed nurses, and I job-shadowed, and looked at RT and LPN and med lab tech as well as some of the PT and OT tech programs. I felt that RN was something I really wanted to do, and I was really pumped up and had great grades in my prereqs, and I know I have no problems learning. I was just totally miserable at that diploma school. I didn't just take free handout money and go goof off. I was literally defeated by that program, and I have never failed at anything in my life, especially not academics. Nursing was vastly different, though.
  4. 0
    Some of the other students got their CNAs and worked weekends as CNA and went to RN school during the week.
  5. 0
    Quote from Streamline2010
    Lost my career after a corporate buyout and subsequent closure of manufacturing facilities and elimination of the corporate engineering and research and development departments. Because it was a job loss due to foreign competition, we all received Trade Act Assistance. That paid for up to 24 months of school, all books, tuition and supplies except computers, and there was an extended unemployment benefit that went with that, as well.

    Trade Act Program: TAA for Workers, Employment & Training Administration (ETA) - U.S. Department of Labor
    I used TAA benefits too. We paid for my pre-reqs (already had all the GE type classes) and then used the retraining benefits to pay for nursing school itself. There have been changes to the extended unemployment benefits, the last I looked you only got it if you started the program within 4 months of being laid off. I didn't qualify for that, but I did receive some extra unemployment through the state rather than TAA.
  6. 0
    I will be paying for school myself. I have been working full-time as a certified pharmacy technician for 6 years and I have been able to save a bit for nursing school. Luckily my tuition for my ADN program will only run about $7000. I don't qualify for most grants/scholarships because I have already graduated from my school with another major and I have about 80 credits (community college) apparently I don't "need" another associates degree and I should be going for my bachelors. Well unless I can get financial aid, I'm sticking with my cheaper community college, no matter how many associates degrees I earn from them! I am terrified of student loans because they can literally haunt you until the day you die! So I'm stuck with paying my way through school. I have been paying my way for 9 years of part time college and I have accumulated zero debt and it feels REALLY good to say that.
    Last edit by christina731 on Oct 5, '12 : Reason: add info
  7. 4
    I chose probably one of the most expensive schools in the US in one of the most expensive cities in the US. It's also the one with the highest average student loan debt for alumni. Great choice. Oof.

    Now that I'm done I'm working one full-time job (nurse), one part-time occasional job (day care provider), and I sell my plasma. Barely scraping by with all of the loans I have! Don't make the mistake I did!
    imintrouble, rubato, joanna73, and 1 other like this.
  8. 0
    For my 2 year tuition in school with books, equipments, and uniform would be ~$ 65,000.

    Living cost ( moved out of state)/food/gas ~$ 25,000

    Totaling a grand whopping: ~ $ 90,000

    How did I pay?

    -Maxed out my federal student loan
    - Maxed out Private Loans
    - After maxing everything out, I had to borrow more from my relative.

    When I get a job, I will barely be scraping by. Think I will be eating ramen for a long long time.
    Last edit by hopeful_27 on Oct 5, '12
  9. 0
    After leaving a 22 year Engineering career, I paid for about a year of nursing prereqs out of savings, and did an accelerated BSN program. In the accel program, I was able to get a "graduate scholarship" based on my GRE scores which paid for ~60% of the tuition. The rest was paid for out of my darling wife's salary, plus student loans, which are about 60% paid off (4 years after graduating).
  10. 1
    Where is the option for "Things I am not very proud of"....

    Nah my rents paid for it.
    imintrouble likes this.


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